Research & Innovation
 

Please note that programme details for the 2021-2027 framework are forthcoming and the information below relates to programmes from the 2014-2020 framework; however, there may currently be open funding calls for this programme.

Click here for open calls / current deadlines.

 

Horizon 2020 is the biggest EU Research and Innovation programme ever with nearly €80 billion of funding available over 7 years (2014 to 2020). It promises more breakthroughs, discoveries and world-firsts by taking great ideas from the lab to the market. 
 

There are significant opportunities for community, voluntary and charitable organisations and social enterprises to partner with researchers and industry to tackle societal challenges. Our sector has unique insight and skills in facilitating ethical research and ensuring the appropriateness of technology and innovation designed to benefit the target groups with whom we work. 


The societal challenges dealt with by Horizon 2020 include:  
 

  • Health, Demographic Change and Wellbeing 

  • Food Security, Sustainable Agriculture and Forestry, Marine, Maritime and Inland Water Research and the Bioeconomy 

  • Secure, Clean and Efficient Energy 

  • Smart, Green and Integrated Transport 

  • Climate Action, Environment, Resource Efficiency and Raw Materials 

  • Europe in a changing world - Inclusive, innovative and reflective societies 

  • Secure societies – Protecting freedom and security of Europe and its citizens. 

 

A popular Horizon 2020 fund for civil society is the Marie Skłodowska-Curie actions and, within that, the CAROLINE programme, which enables organisations to partner with universities to host fully-funded researchers to conduct research in their area.  

 

For a full overview of the H2020, we recommend completing the free, online workshop created by Dr. Séan McCarthy of Hyperion Ltd for The Wheel - Horizon 2020: Opportunities for Voluntary Organisations.  

 

Want to find out more? 

Visit the Horizon 2020 website to learn more and find the specific area relevant to your work. You can also visit the Irish Horizon 2020 website and reach our the H2020 national contact points in Ireland.  

 

The contact point for Marie Skłodowska-Curie actions in Ireland is the Irish Universities Association and the CAROLINE programme is managed by the Irish Research Council.  

Current Funding

Horizon Europe: MSCA Doctoral Networks 2021


Horizon Europe is the EU’s key funding programme for research and innovation.

The MSCA Doctoral Networks aim to train creative, entrepreneurial, innovative and resilient doctoral candidates, able to face current and future challenges and to convert knowledge and ideas into products and services for economic and social benefit.

Deadline: 16 November 2021, 17:00 Brussels time

Application Link Overview

The MSCA Doctoral Networks will raise the attractiveness and excellence of doctoral training in Europe. They will equip researchers with the right combination of research-related and transferable competences and provide them with enhanced career perspectives in both the academic and non-academic sectors through international, interdisciplinary and inter-sectoral mobility combined with an innovation-oriented mind-set.

Introduction

The European Union needs a strong, resilient, flexible and creative human resource base, with the right combination of skills to match the future needs of the labour market, to innovate and to convert knowledge and ideas into products and services for economic and social benefit. The Covid-19 crisis has highlighted once more the importance of the Union’s reliance on a highly skilled research-based human capital that is able to detect and tackle upcoming challenges, to communicate scientific evidence to policy-makers and the public at large, and to work across disciplines.

In this context, the Union must reinforce its efforts to encourage more young women and men to make a career in research, promote its attractiveness for top talents from around the world, retain its own researchers and reintegrate those working elsewhere. The Marie Skłodowska-Curie Actions (MSCA) are the main instrument at Union-level to do so. Since their launch in 1996, they have become the Union’s reference programme for doctoral education and postdoctoral training. Between 2014 and 2020, in the context of Horizon 2020, the MSCA have supported 65 000 researchers in Europe and beyond, both doctoral candidates and more experienced researchers, and have funded over 1 000 excellent international doctoral networks.

The MSCA strongly contribute to excellent research, boosting jobs, growth and investment by equipping researchers with new knowledge and skills and providing them with an international as well as inter-sectoral exposure (including through academia-business collaboration), to fill the top positions of tomorrow.

The MSCA do not only have a positive impact on individual researchers, they also contribute to the development of excellent doctoral programmes, postdoctoral training programmes and collaborative research projects. They have a structuring impact on higher education institutions and other entities way beyond academia by widely spreading excellence and setting standards for high-quality researcher education and training, not only across the European Research Area (ERA), but also worldwide. Positive structuring effects on organisations include:

  • increasing the quality of researchers’ training and supervision offered;
  • strengthening research capacity (e.g. ability to attract funding);
  • improving human resources practices and procedures, and providing fairer and more attractive working conditions for researchers, including through career guidance and development;
  • building new and sustainable international and inter-sectoral partnerships and networks; better transfer of knowledge between sectors and disciplines, enhancing their global reputation and visibility.

Main principles applying to the MSCA

Excellence

The MSCA focus on excellence in various aspects: excellence does not only apply to the individual fellows supported or the collaborations fostered and knowledge transferred, but also to the R&I methodologies applied, the research conducted as well as the training, supervision and career guidance provided. Long-term investment in people pays off, as indicated inter alia by the number of Nobel Prize winners who have been either former MSCA fellows or supervisors.

Mobility

The MSCA are based on the principle of physical mobility: researchers who receive funding have to move from one country to another to acquire new knowledge, skills and competences, and develop their research career. Researchers are also strongly encouraged to move between sectors and disciplines.

While virtual mobility does not have the same multifaceted impact on the development of individuals and sustainable cooperation among organisations as physical mobility, it can however complement it, facilitate long-distance collaboration and be an effective means to faster achieving research and training objectives. In this regard, all MSCA proposals are encouraged to explore opportunities offered by e-infrastructures and related services, in particular those provided through GEANT1, the pan-European research and education network.

Bottom-up and open to the world

The MSCA are open to all domains of research and innovation, chosen freely by the applicants in a fully bottom-up manner, addressed under the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union. In addition, Postdoctoral Fellowships can also address domains covered by the Treaty establishing the European Atomic Energy Community (Euratom Research and Training Programme 2021-2025). All MSCA will complement top-down collaborative research activities, notably contributing to the Horizon Europe Missions.

The MSCA have also a strong international dimension: international cooperation is particularly encouraged as it allows institutions to set-up strategic collaborations worldwide, attracts foreign talents to Europe and provides European researchers with access to unique expertise, facilities, testing environments or data available only outside Europe.

Recruitment, working/employment conditions and inclusiveness

The principles of the European Charter for Researchers and Code of Conduct for the Recruitment of Researchers (Charter and Code) promoting open, merit-based and transparent recruitment and attractive working and employment conditions are a cornerstone of the MSCA and all funded host organisations must put effort into applying them. The Page MSCA pay particular attention to equal opportunities and inclusiveness. In line with the Charter and Code, all MSCA-funded projects are encouraged to embrace diversity and take measures to facilitate mobility and counter-act gender and disability-related barriers to it.

MSCA projects are also encouraged to facilitate access by researchers at risk2, through tailored support and career services, including job search assistance in the researcher’s new geographical area.

Supervision

The MSCA promote effective supervision, which contribute to creating a supportive environment for the researchers to conduct their work. In line with the principles set out in the Charter and Code, MSCA beneficiaries must ensure adequately supervision or mentoring and appropriate career guidance. Supervision is one of the crucial elements of successful research. Guiding, supporting, directing, advising and mentoring are key factors for a researcher to pursue his/her career path. In this context, all MSCA-funded projects are encouraged to follow the recommendations outlined in the Guidelines for MSCA supervision3.

Open Science and Responsible Research and Innovation

The MSCA endorse Open Science and Responsible Research and Innovation (RRI) through engaging society at large, integrating the gender and ethical dimensions, promoting Open Science practices through targeted training activities, ensuring open access to research outcomes, including FAIR4 data handling, encouraging formal and informal science education and feeding back research results into teaching and education.

European Green Deal

The MSCA support bottom-up and frontier/applied research contributing directly to the European Commission’s commitment to tackling climate and environmental-related challenges. Under Horizon Europe, the MSCA will significantly contribute to promote sustainable research in line with the European Green Deal, the United Nation’s 2030 Agenda and the Sustainable Development Goals. All MSCA-funded projects are encouraged to address the principles of the MSCA Green Charter5 and implement measures to minimise the environmental footprint of their activities.

Synergies

The MSCA promote the creation of strong links with the Cohesion policy funds and the Recovery and Resilience Facility (RRF)6, notably by creating synergies through its COFUND action and enabling complementarities via awarding a Seal of Excellence certificate to proposals submitted to mono-beneficiary MSCA calls. The Seal is awarded to proposals that exceed all of the evaluation thresholds set out in this work programme, but cannot be funded due to lack of budget.

MSCA Intervention areas

There are five main MSCA intervention areas as set out in the Council Decision establishing the specific programme implementing Horizon Europe (Annex 1, page 11-13). All individual Marie Skłodowska-Curie Actions contribute to these intervention areas to one extent or the other:

  1. Nurturing Excellence through Mobility of Researchers across Borders, Sectors and Disciplines;
  2. Fostering new Skills through Excellent Training of Researchers;
  3. Strengthening Human Capital and Skills Development across the European Research Area;
  4. Improving and Facilitating Synergies;
  5. Promoting Public Outreach.

Expected impact

Proposals under this Action should contribute to the following expected impacts:

  • Strengthen Europe's human capital base in R&I by training highly-skilled doctoral candidates,
  • Improve the attractiveness of researchers’ careers notably through better working and employment conditions of doctoral candidates in Europe
  • Enhance talent and knowledge circulation across the R&I landscape, through inter-sectoral, interdisciplinary and international mobility
  • Increase Europe's attractiveness as a leading research destination
  • Enhance the quality of R&I contributing to Europe's sustainable competitiveness
  • Establish sustainable collaboration between academic and non-academic organisations
  • Foster the culture of open science, innovation and entrepreneurship

Expected Outcome

Project results are expected to contribute to the following outcomes:

For supported doctoral candidates

  • New research and transferable skills and competences, leading to improved employability and career prospects within and outside academia;
  • New knowledge allowing the conversion of ideas into products and services, where relevant;
  • Enhanced networking and communication capacities with scientific peers, as well as with the general public that will increase and broaden the research and innovation impact.
For participating organisations
  • Improved quality, relevance and sustainability of doctoral training programmes and supervision arrangements;
  • Enhanced cooperation and transfer of knowledge between sectors and disciplines;
  • Increased integration of training and research activities between participating organisations;
  • Boosted R&I capacity;
  • Increased internationalisation and attractiveness;
  • Regular feedback of research results into teaching and education at participating organisations.

Scope

MSCA Doctoral Networks will implement doctoral programmes, by partnerships of universities, research institutions and research infrastructures, businesses including SMEs, and other socio-economic actors from different countries across Europe and beyond. MSCA Doctoral Networks are indeed open to the participation of organisations from third countries, in view of fostering strategic international partnerships for the training and exchange of researchers.

These doctoral programmes will respond to well-identified needs in various R&I areas, expose the researchers to the academic and non-academic sectors, and offer training in research-related, as well as transferable skills9 and competences relevant for innovation and long-term employability (e.g. entrepreneurship, commercialisation of results, Intellectual Property Rights, communication). Proposals for doctoral networks can reflect existing or planned research partnerships among the participating organisations.

The selection procedure for doctoral candidates must be open, transparent and merit-based, in line with the Code of Conduct for the Recruitment of Researchers. The vacancy notice (to be widely advertised internationally, including on the EURAXESS10 website) must include the gross salary (not including employer’s social contributions) offered to the researcher.

MSCA Doctoral Networks are encouraged to lead to Industrial or Joint Doctorates.

Industrial Doctorates

Through Industrial Doctorates, doctoral candidates will step outside academia and develop skills in industry and business by being jointly supervised by academic and non-academic organisations, both of which can be established in the same EU Member State or Horizon Europe Associated Country.

Joint Doctorates

Joint Doctorates represent a highly integrated type of international, inter-sectoral and multi/interdisciplinary collaboration in doctoral training. They lead to the delivery of joint, double or multiple doctoral degrees11 recognised in at least two EU Member States or Horizon Europe Associated Countries.

Steering Board

Each MSCA Doctoral Network should have a clearly identified steering board co-ordinating network-wide training and research activities and establishing continuous communication and exchange of best practice among the participating organisations to maximise the benefits of the partnership.

Training activities

MSCA Doctoral Networks should exploit complementarities between participating organisations and foster sharing of knowledge and networking activities for example through the organisation of workshops and conferences. Proposed training activities should respond to well identified needs in various R&I areas, with appropriate references to inter- and multidisciplinary fields and follow the EU Principles for Innovative Doctoral Training12. They should be primarily focused on developing new scientific knowledge through original research on personalised projects.

12 https://euraxess.ec.europa.eu/sites/default/files/policy_library/principles_for_innovative_doctoral_training.pdf

Inter-sectoral secondments of researchers to other participating organisations, including in third countries, are encouraged when relevant, feasible and beneficial for the researchers and in line with the project objectives. This will increase the employability of the researchers outside academia.

Doctoral Networks should develop substantial training modules, including digital ones, addressing key transferable skills and competences common to all fields and fostering the culture of Open Science, innovation and entrepreneurship. In particular, Doctoral Networks should adequately prepare doctoral candidates for increased research collaboration and information-sharing made possible by new (digital) technologies (e.g. collaborative tools, opening access to publications and to research data, FAIR data management, public engagement and citizen science, etc.).

Supervision

Particular attention is paid to the quality of supervision and mentoring arrangements as well as career guidance. Joint supervision of the researchers is mandatory for Industrial and Joint Doctorates.

Career Development Plan

A Career Development Plan must be established jointly by the supervisor and each recruited doctoral candidate. In case of joint supervision, such a plan should be established involving all supervisors. In addition to research objectives, this plan comprises the researcher's training and career needs, including training on transferable skills, teaching, planning for publications and participation in conferences and events aiming at opening science and research to citizens. The plan, established at the beginning of the recruitment, should be revised (and updated where needed) within 18 months.

Application Details

See full details in the official call document.

All proposals must be submitted directly online via the Funding & Tenders Portal Electronic Submission System.




Horizon Europe: MSCA Postdoctoral Fellowships 2021


Horizon Europe is the EU’s key funding programme for research and innovation.

MSCA and Citizens aims to bring research and researchers closer to the public at large, to increase awareness of research and innovation activities and to boost public recognition of science and research education.

Deadline: 12 October 2021, 17:00 Brussels time

Application Link Overview MSCA and Citizens will show the role of the researcher for the society and economy, as well as the impact of researchers’ work on citizens’ daily lives. It also aims to raise the interest of young people in research and scientific careers. MSCA and Citizens will address the general public, attracting people regardless of the level of their scientific background, with a specific focus on families, pupils, students, and notably those who do not have easy access to, and thus are less inclined to engage in, STEAM fields (science, technology, engineering, arts and mathematics) or research activities. Inclusiveness should be key, in view of broadening access to science and research to all. MSCA and Citizens should also promote gender balance and inclusiveness in science, Open Science, and Responsible Research and Innovation. These objectives will be pursued through the organisation of the European Researchers’ Night, the largest research communication and promotion event taking place across EU Member States and Horizon Europe Associated Countries. The European Researchers’ Night will include the Researchers at Schools initiative which aims to strengthen the connection between research and education, by bringing researchers to schools to encourage interaction with pupils at all levels of primary and secondary education. Researchers and school pupils will meet to talk about current and future challenges of our societies and the related key role of research. Pupils will learn directly about research projects and activities addressing the EU priorities and main orientations.

Introduction

The European Union needs a strong, resilient, flexible and creative human resource base, with the right combination of skills to match the future needs of the labour market, to innovate and to convert knowledge and ideas into products and services for economic and social benefit. The Covid-19 crisis has highlighted once more the importance of the Union’s reliance on a highly skilled research-based human capital that is able to detect and tackle upcoming challenges, to communicate scientific evidence to policy-makers and the public at large, and to work across disciplines.

In this context, the Union must reinforce its efforts to encourage more young women and men to make a career in research, promote its attractiveness for top talents from around the world, retain its own researchers and reintegrate those working elsewhere. The Marie Skłodowska-Curie Actions (MSCA) are the main instrument at Union-level to do so. Since their launch in 1996, they have become the Union’s reference programme for doctoral education and postdoctoral training. Between 2014 and 2020, in the context of Horizon 2020, the MSCA have supported 65 000 researchers in Europe and beyond, both doctoral candidates and more experienced researchers, and have funded over 1 000 excellent international doctoral networks.

The MSCA strongly contribute to excellent research, boosting jobs, growth and investment by equipping researchers with new knowledge and skills and providing them with an international as well as inter-sectoral exposure (including through academia-business collaboration), to fill the top positions of tomorrow.

The MSCA do not only have a positive impact on individual researchers, they also contribute to the development of excellent doctoral programmes, postdoctoral training programmes and collaborative research projects. They have a structuring impact on higher education institutions and other entities way beyond academia by widely spreading excellence and setting standards for high-quality researcher education and training, not only across the European Research Area (ERA), but also worldwide. Positive structuring effects on organisations include:

  • increasing the quality of researchers’ training and supervision offered;
  • strengthening research capacity (e.g. ability to attract funding);
  • improving human resources practices and procedures, and providing fairer and more attractive working conditions for researchers, including through career guidance and development;
  • building new and sustainable international and inter-sectoral partnerships and networks; better transfer of knowledge between sectors and disciplines, enhancing their global reputation and visibility.

Main principles applying to the MSCA

Excellence

The MSCA focus on excellence in various aspects: excellence does not only apply to the individual fellows supported or the collaborations fostered and knowledge transferred, but also to the R&I methodologies applied, the research conducted as well as the training, supervision and career guidance provided. Long-term investment in people pays off, as indicated inter alia by the number of Nobel Prize winners who have been either former MSCA fellows or supervisors.

Mobility

The MSCA are based on the principle of physical mobility: researchers who receive funding have to move from one country to another to acquire new knowledge, skills and competences, and develop their research career. Researchers are also strongly encouraged to move between sectors and disciplines.

While virtual mobility does not have the same multifaceted impact on the development of individuals and sustainable cooperation among organisations as physical mobility, it can however complement it, facilitate long-distance collaboration and be an effective means to faster achieving research and training objectives. In this regard, all MSCA proposals are encouraged to explore opportunities offered by e-infrastructures and related services, in particular those provided through GEANT1, the pan-European research and education network.

Bottom-up and open to the world

The MSCA are open to all domains of research and innovation, chosen freely by the applicants in a fully bottom-up manner, addressed under the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union. In addition, Postdoctoral Fellowships can also address domains covered by the Treaty establishing the European Atomic Energy Community (Euratom Research and Training Programme 2021-2025). All MSCA will complement top-down collaborative research activities, notably contributing to the Horizon Europe Missions.

The MSCA have also a strong international dimension: international cooperation is particularly encouraged as it allows institutions to set-up strategic collaborations worldwide, attracts foreign talents to Europe and provides European researchers with access to unique expertise, facilities, testing environments or data available only outside Europe.

Recruitment, working/employment conditions and inclusiveness

The principles of the European Charter for Researchers and Code of Conduct for the Recruitment of Researchers (Charter and Code) promoting open, merit-based and transparent recruitment and attractive working and employment conditions are a cornerstone of the MSCA and all funded host organisations must put effort into applying them. The Page MSCA pay particular attention to equal opportunities and inclusiveness. In line with the Charter and Code, all MSCA-funded projects are encouraged to embrace diversity and take measures to facilitate mobility and counter-act gender and disability-related barriers to it.

MSCA projects are also encouraged to facilitate access by researchers at risk2, through tailored support and career services, including job search assistance in the researcher’s new geographical area.

Supervision

The MSCA promote effective supervision, which contribute to creating a supportive environment for the researchers to conduct their work. In line with the principles set out in the Charter and Code, MSCA beneficiaries must ensure adequately supervision or mentoring and appropriate career guidance. Supervision is one of the crucial elements of successful research. Guiding, supporting, directing, advising and mentoring are key factors for a researcher to pursue his/her career path. In this context, all MSCA-funded projects are encouraged to follow the recommendations outlined in the Guidelines for MSCA supervision3.

Open Science and Responsible Research and Innovation

The MSCA endorse Open Science and Responsible Research and Innovation (RRI) through engaging society at large, integrating the gender and ethical dimensions, promoting Open Science practices through targeted training activities, ensuring open access to research outcomes, including FAIR4 data handling, encouraging formal and informal science education and feeding back research results into teaching and education.

European Green Deal

The MSCA support bottom-up and frontier/applied research contributing directly to the European Commission’s commitment to tackling climate and environmental-related challenges. Under Horizon Europe, the MSCA will significantly contribute to promote sustainable research in line with the European Green Deal, the United Nation’s 2030 Agenda and the Sustainable Development Goals. All MSCA-funded projects are encouraged to address the principles of the MSCA Green Charter5 and implement measures to minimise the environmental footprint of their activities.

Synergies

The MSCA promote the creation of strong links with the Cohesion policy funds and the Recovery and Resilience Facility (RRF)6, notably by creating synergies through its COFUND action and enabling complementarities via awarding a Seal of Excellence certificate to proposals submitted to mono-beneficiary MSCA calls. The Seal is awarded to proposals that exceed all of the evaluation thresholds set out in this work programme, but cannot be funded due to lack of budget.

MSCA Intervention areas

There are five main MSCA intervention areas as set out in the Council Decision establishing the specific programme implementing Horizon Europe (Annex 1, page 11-13). All individual Marie Skłodowska-Curie Actions contribute to these intervention areas to one extent or the other:

  1. Nurturing Excellence through Mobility of Researchers across Borders, Sectors and Disciplines;
  2. Fostering new Skills through Excellent Training of Researchers;
  3. Strengthening Human Capital and Skills Development across the European Research Area;
  4. Improving and Facilitating Synergies;
  5. Promoting Public Outreach.

Expected Impact

Proposals under this Action should contribute to the following expected impacts:

  • Enhance engagement with citizens on R&I;
  • Increase awareness among the general public of the importance and benefits of R&I and its concrete impact on citizens’ daily life;
  • Contribute to the diffusion and the promotion of excellence research projects across Europe and beyond;
  • Raise the interest of young people in science and research careers;
  • Contribute to a better understanding of the European Union policies and programmes among the general public;
  • Support school teachers in developing a scientific approach around priority topics and creating a learning opportunity for pupils through a direct interaction with researchers.

Expected Outcome

Project results are expected to contribute to the following outcomes:

For researchers

  • Enhanced opportunities to interact with citizens and local, regional and national authorities;
  • Improved communication skills and competences to interact with a non-research audience, notably with pupils and students.

For organisations

  • Increased reputation and visibility of participating organisations in terms of hosting excellence research projects towards the general public and possible future students;
  • Researchers’ work made more tangible, concrete, accessible, and thus opening research and science to all;
  • Improved outreach to all audiences, and notably those who do not have an easy access to science and research activities;
  • Better communication of R&I results and activities to society, increased and strengthened opportunities for citizens’ engagement.

Scope

The European Researchers' Night takes place every year, on the last Friday of September54. It supports events that can last up to two days: they can start on Friday and continue the following day. Pre-events, prior to the main event, and related post-events, such as wrap-up meetings or small-scale follow-up events, can also be organised.

It is the occasion for a Europe-wide public and media event for the promotion of research careers, in particular focused on young people and their families.

The European Researchers’ Night targets the general public, addressing and attracting people regardless of the level of their scientific background, with a special focus on families, pupils and students, and notably those who do not have easy access to, and thus are less inclined to engage in STEAM fields (science, technology, engineering, arts and mathematics) or research activities.

The European Researchers’ Night will also bring researchers to schools to interact with pupils at any time during the project duration. The Researchers at Schools activities will allow researchers and pupils to interact on societal challenges and on the key role of research to address them. Pupils will thus also learn directly about research projects and initiatives related to EU main priorities.

Types of activities

Activities can combine education with entertainment, especially when addressing young audiences. They can take various forms, such as exhibitions, hands-on experiments, science shows, simulations, debates, games, competitions, quizzes, etc. Where appropriate, engagement with educational institutions should be sought in order to encourage formal and informal science education with the aim of improving the scientific knowledge base. This will be particularly relevant for Researchers at Schools activities, which will allow researchers to showcase their work and interact with pupils. Researchers will engage with teachers and pupils on challenges related to climate change, sustainable development, health and other issues related to the European Commission priorities and main orientations, such as the European Green Deal or the EU Research and Innovation Missions. The Researchers at Schools activities should take place throughout the year and should be subject to a dedicated promotion, particularly towards schools.

The European Researchers’ Night should be highlighted as a European (and Europe-wide) event, and each proposal should promote the European Union and its impact on citizens’ daily life in the most appropriate way, according to the set-up and the configuration of the event, its location and its activities.

Involvement of researchers funded by Horizon Europe or previous Framework Programmes, notably by the Marie Skłodowska-Curie Actions, is highly encouraged.

The European Researchers’ Night promotes gender balance, diversity and inclusiveness in science in terms of planned activities and researchers involved.

The European Commission has defined priorities, notably through the Horizon Europe Missions, which aim to tackle challenges faced by our societies.

For the 2022 call, applicants are encouraged to focus on, and include activities relating to, priorities identified by the Missions in their events.

Partnerships and coordination at regional, national or cross-border levels will be strongly encouraged aiming at a good geographical spread and avoiding overlaps. Activities carried-out in non-associated third countries are not eligible for funding.

Applicants are encouraged to submit proposals covering two successive editions (2022 and 2023) of the European Researcher’s Night.

High-quality applications not retained due to lack of funding may be granted the status of associated events.

Eligible costs will take the form of lump sum contributions as stipulated in Decision of 11 March 2021 authorising the use of lump sum contributions and unit contributions for Marie Skłodowska-Curie actions under the Horizon Europe Programme.

The expected EU contribution per project, mentioned in the indicative budget and specific conditions above, are for a single55 annual edition of the European Researchers' Night.

Application Details

See full details in the official call document.

All proposals must be submitted directly online via the Funding & Tenders Portal Electronic Submission System.




Horizon Europe: MSCA and Citizens 2022 - European Researchers' Night 2022-2023


Horizon Europe is the EU’s key funding programme for research and innovation.

The goal of MSCA Postdoctoral Fellowships is to enhance the creative and innovative potential of researchers holding a PhD and who wish to acquire new skills through advanced training, international, interdisciplinary and inter-sectoral mobility.

Deadline: 16 November 2021, 17:00 Brussels time

Application Link Overview MSCA Postdoctoral Fellowships will be open to excellent researchers of any nationality. The scheme also encourages researchers to work on research and innovation projects in the non-academic sector and is open to researchers wishing to reintegrate in Europe, to those who are displaced by conflict, as well as to researchers with high potential who are seeking to restart their careers in research. Through the implementation of an original and personalised research project, MSCA Postdoctoral Fellowships aim to foster excellence through training and mobility and to equip researchers with new skills and competences in order to identify solutions to current and future challenges. Postdoctoral researchers are encouraged to reach out to society at large to make the results of their research visible to citizens.

Introduction

The European Union needs a strong, resilient, flexible and creative human resource base, with the right combination of skills to match the future needs of the labour market, to innovate and to convert knowledge and ideas into products and services for economic and social benefit. The Covid-19 crisis has highlighted once more the importance of the Union’s reliance on a highly skilled research-based human capital that is able to detect and tackle upcoming challenges, to communicate scientific evidence to policy-makers and the public at large, and to work across disciplines.

In this context, the Union must reinforce its efforts to encourage more young women and men to make a career in research, promote its attractiveness for top talents from around the world, retain its own researchers and reintegrate those working elsewhere. The Marie Skłodowska-Curie Actions (MSCA) are the main instrument at Union-level to do so. Since their launch in 1996, they have become the Union’s reference programme for doctoral education and postdoctoral training. Between 2014 and 2020, in the context of Horizon 2020, the MSCA have supported 65 000 researchers in Europe and beyond, both doctoral candidates and more experienced researchers, and have funded over 1 000 excellent international doctoral networks.

The MSCA strongly contribute to excellent research, boosting jobs, growth and investment by equipping researchers with new knowledge and skills and providing them with an international as well as inter-sectoral exposure (including through academia-business collaboration), to fill the top positions of tomorrow.

The MSCA do not only have a positive impact on individual researchers, they also contribute to the development of excellent doctoral programmes, postdoctoral training programmes and collaborative research projects. They have a structuring impact on higher education institutions and other entities way beyond academia by widely spreading excellence and setting standards for high-quality researcher education and training, not only across the European Research Area (ERA), but also worldwide. Positive structuring effects on organisations include:

  • increasing the quality of researchers’ training and supervision offered;
  • strengthening research capacity (e.g. ability to attract funding);
  • improving human resources practices and procedures, and providing fairer and more attractive working conditions for researchers, including through career guidance and development;
  • building new and sustainable international and inter-sectoral partnerships and networks; better transfer of knowledge between sectors and disciplines, enhancing their global reputation and visibility.

Main principles applying to the MSCA

Excellence

The MSCA focus on excellence in various aspects: excellence does not only apply to the individual fellows supported or the collaborations fostered and knowledge transferred, but also to the R&I methodologies applied, the research conducted as well as the training, supervision and career guidance provided. Long-term investment in people pays off, as indicated inter alia by the number of Nobel Prize winners who have been either former MSCA fellows or supervisors.

Mobility

The MSCA are based on the principle of physical mobility: researchers who receive funding have to move from one country to another to acquire new knowledge, skills and competences, and develop their research career. Researchers are also strongly encouraged to move between sectors and disciplines.

While virtual mobility does not have the same multifaceted impact on the development of individuals and sustainable cooperation among organisations as physical mobility, it can however complement it, facilitate long-distance collaboration and be an effective means to faster achieving research and training objectives. In this regard, all MSCA proposals are encouraged to explore opportunities offered by e-infrastructures and related services, in particular those provided through GEANT1, the pan-European research and education network.

Bottom-up and open to the world

The MSCA are open to all domains of research and innovation, chosen freely by the applicants in a fully bottom-up manner, addressed under the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union. In addition, Postdoctoral Fellowships can also address domains covered by the Treaty establishing the European Atomic Energy Community (Euratom Research and Training Programme 2021-2025). All MSCA will complement top-down collaborative research activities, notably contributing to the Horizon Europe Missions.

The MSCA have also a strong international dimension: international cooperation is particularly encouraged as it allows institutions to set-up strategic collaborations worldwide, attracts foreign talents to Europe and provides European researchers with access to unique expertise, facilities, testing environments or data available only outside Europe.

Recruitment, working/employment conditions and inclusiveness

The principles of the European Charter for Researchers and Code of Conduct for the Recruitment of Researchers (Charter and Code) promoting open, merit-based and transparent recruitment and attractive working and employment conditions are a cornerstone of the MSCA and all funded host organisations must put effort into applying them. The Page MSCA pay particular attention to equal opportunities and inclusiveness. In line with the Charter and Code, all MSCA-funded projects are encouraged to embrace diversity and take measures to facilitate mobility and counter-act gender and disability-related barriers to it.

MSCA projects are also encouraged to facilitate access by researchers at risk2, through tailored support and career services, including job search assistance in the researcher’s new geographical area.

Supervision

The MSCA promote effective supervision, which contribute to creating a supportive environment for the researchers to conduct their work. In line with the principles set out in the Charter and Code, MSCA beneficiaries must ensure adequately supervision or mentoring and appropriate career guidance. Supervision is one of the crucial elements of successful research. Guiding, supporting, directing, advising and mentoring are key factors for a researcher to pursue his/her career path. In this context, all MSCA-funded projects are encouraged to follow the recommendations outlined in the Guidelines for MSCA supervision3.

Open Science and Responsible Research and Innovation

The MSCA endorse Open Science and Responsible Research and Innovation (RRI) through engaging society at large, integrating the gender and ethical dimensions, promoting Open Science practices through targeted training activities, ensuring open access to research outcomes, including FAIR4 data handling, encouraging formal and informal science education and feeding back research results into teaching and education.

European Green Deal

The MSCA support bottom-up and frontier/applied research contributing directly to the European Commission’s commitment to tackling climate and environmental-related challenges. Under Horizon Europe, the MSCA will significantly contribute to promote sustainable research in line with the European Green Deal, the United Nation’s 2030 Agenda and the Sustainable Development Goals. All MSCA-funded projects are encouraged to address the principles of the MSCA Green Charter5 and implement measures to minimise the environmental footprint of their activities.

Synergies

The MSCA promote the creation of strong links with the Cohesion policy funds and the Recovery and Resilience Facility (RRF)6, notably by creating synergies through its COFUND action and enabling complementarities via awarding a Seal of Excellence certificate to proposals submitted to mono-beneficiary MSCA calls. The Seal is awarded to proposals that exceed all of the evaluation thresholds set out in this work programme, but cannot be funded due to lack of budget.

MSCA Intervention areas

There are five main MSCA intervention areas as set out in the Council Decision establishing the specific programme implementing Horizon Europe (Annex 1, page 11-13). All individual Marie Skłodowska-Curie Actions contribute to these intervention areas to one extent or the other:

  1. Nurturing Excellence through Mobility of Researchers across Borders, Sectors and Disciplines;
  2. Fostering new Skills through Excellent Training of Researchers;
  3. Strengthening Human Capital and Skills Development across the European Research Area;
  4. Improving and Facilitating Synergies;
  5. Promoting Public Outreach.

Expected impact

Proposals under this Action should contribute to the following expected impacts:

  • Enhance the creative and innovative potential of researchers holding a PhD and wishing to diversify their individual competences and skills through advanced training, international, interdisciplinary and inter-sectoral mobility while implementing excellent research projects across all sectors of research;
  • Strengthen Europe's human capital base in R&I with better trained, innovative and entrepreneurial researchers;
  • Enhance the quality of R&I contributing to Europe's competitiveness and growth;
  • Contribute to Europe's attractiveness as a leading destination for R&I and for good working conditions of researchers;
  • Facilitate knowledge transfer and brain circulation across the ERA;
  • Foster the culture of open science, innovation and entrepreneurship.

Expected Outcome

Project results are expected to contribute to the following outcomes:

For supported postdoctoral fellows

  • Increased set of research and transferable skills and competences, leading to improved employability and career prospects of MSCA postdoctoral fellows within academia and beyond;
  • New mind-sets and approaches to R&I work forged through interdisciplinary, inter-sectoral and international experience;
  • Enhanced networking and communication capacities with scientific peers, as well as with the general public that will increase and broaden the research and innovation impact.

For participating organisations

  • Increased alignment of working conditions for researchers in accordance with the principles set out in the European Charter for Researchers and the Code of Conduct for the Recruitment of Researchers;
  • Enhanced quality and sustainability of research training and supervision;
  • Increased global attractiveness, visibility and reputation of the participating organisation(s);
  • Stronger R&I capacity and output among participating organisations; better transfer of knowledge;
  • Regular feedback of research results into teaching and education at participating organisations.

Scope

Fellowships will be provided to excellent researchers, undertaking international mobility either to or between EU Member States or Horizon Europe Associated Countries, as well as to non-associated Third Countries. Applications will be made jointly by the researcher and a beneficiary in the academic or non-academic sector.

Postdoctoral Fellowships either can take place in Europe (i.e. in an EU Member State or a Horizon Europe Associated Country) or in a Third Country not associated to Horizon Europe:

  • European Postdoctoral Fellowships are open to researchers of any nationality who wish to engage in R&I projects by either coming to Europe from any country in the world or moving within Europe. The standard duration of these fellowships must be between 12 and 24 months.
  • Global Postdoctoral Fellowships are open to European nationals or long-term residents19 who wish to engage in R&I projects with organisations outside EU Member States and Horizon Europe Associated Countries. These fellowships require an outgoing phase of minimum 12 and maximum 24 months in a non-associated Third Country, and a mandatory 12-month return phase to a host organisation based in an EU Member State or a Horizon Europe Associated Country.

Specific eligibility conditions apply to MSCA Postdoctoral Fellowships in the research areas covered by the Euratom Research and Training Programme 2021-2025.

Secondments

Researchers receiving a Postdoctoral Fellowship may opt to include a secondment phase, within the overall duration of their fellowship in any country worldwide. The secondment phase can be a single period or be divided into shorter mobility periods.

For European Postdoctoral Fellowships, secondments cannot exceed one third of the standard fellowship duration and should be in line with the project objectives, adding significant value and impact to the fellowship.

For Global Postdoctoral Fellowships, optional secondments are permitted for up to one third of the outgoing phase. A maximum of three months can be spent at the start of the project at the beneficiary (or any other organisation mentioned in the description of the action), allowing the researcher to spend time there before going to the associated partner in the Third Country. Secondments cannot take place during the mandatory twelve-month return period to the host organisation in an EU Member State or Horizon Europe Associated Country. Page 26 of 107

Placements in the non-academic sector

Postdoctoral Fellowships can provide an additional period of up to six months to support researchers seeking a placement at the end of the project to work on R&I projects in an organisation from the non-academic sector established in an EU Member State or Horizon Europe Associated Country21. While this possibility is also available to fellows recruited in the non-academic sector, such a placement must be implemented at a different non-academic host organisation established in an EU Member State or Horizon Europe Associated Country22. The request for such a placement must be an integral part of the proposal, explaining the added-value for the project and for the career development of the researcher, and will be subject to evaluation. It must be substantiated by a letter of commitment from the European non-academic organisation where the placement takes place23. This incentive aims at promoting career moves between sectors and organisations and thereby stimulate innovation and knowledge transfer while expanding career opportunities for researchers.

Training activities

The training activities implemented under the Postdoctoral Fellowships should include training for key transferable skills24, foster innovation and entrepreneurship, (e.g. commercialisation of results, Intellectual Property Rights, communication, public engagement and citizen science) and promote Open Science practices (open access to publications and to research data, FAIR data management, etc.).

Career Development Plan

In order to equip MSCA postdoctoral fellows with skills that enhance and expand their career opportunities inside and outside academia, a Career Development Plan should be established jointly by the supervisor(s) and the researcher. In addition to research objectives, this plan should comprise the researcher's training and career needs, including training on transferable skills, teaching, planning for publications and participation in conferences and events aiming at opening science and research to citizens. The Plan will have to be submitted as a project deliverable at the beginning of the action and can be updated when needed.

Euratom

Aiming to enhance nuclear expertise and excellence as well as synergies between Programmes, organisations active in nuclear research established in one of EU Member States or countries associated to the Euratom Research and Training programme 2021-202525 , are eligible to participate. MSCA Postdoctoral Fellowships in this area of research will be supported by the Euratom Research and Training Programme 2021-2025 through an indicative annual financial contribution of EUR 1 million to the MSCA Postdoctoral Fellowships call.

ERA Fellowships

The ERA Fellowships implemented through Work Programme Annex 11, Widening Participation and Strengthening the European Research Area, provide specific support to researchers to undertake their fellowship in a widening country27. This will help spread excellence and contribute to fostering balanced brain circulation in widening countries.

Application Details

See full details in the official call document.

All proposals must be submitted directly online via the Funding & Tenders Portal Electronic Submission System.




Horizon Europe: Pillar 3 - A capacity-building and brokering network to make citizen science an integral part of the European Research Area


Horizon Europe is the EU’s key funding programme for research and innovation.

This call aims to strengthen links and collaboration between citizen science initiatives and other research and innovation actors.

Deadline: 23 September 2021, 17:00 Brussels time

Application Link Overview

Citizen Science is a rapidly emerging mode of research and innovation that shows huge promise in terms of collecting new qualities and quantities of data, harnessing collective intelligence, improving science-society literacy, and improving the relationship between science and society. However, it is embedded institutionally only to a limited extent, at an early stage of developing data infrastructures, and lacks the capacities and sustainable resourcing required to live up to its potentials.

This action will become a central point of exchange between citizen science in Horizon 2020, Horizon Europe, and other EU-level and sub-national programmes and initiatives. It should amplify significant outcomes of citizen science in areas such as Horizon Europe’s Missions, should they be confirmed, Clusters and Partnerships, the Sustainable Development Goals, and the Green Deal, across all parts of the research and innovation system. It should maintain up-to-date repositories of initiatives, good practices and tools, and become a stage for discussion and collaboration.

Activities to be funded

This action should offer extensive in situ brokering, skills, training, and capacity building services to citizen science practitioners, civil society, public authorities, businesses/SMEs, formal and informal education establishments, and research funding and performing organisations, with a view to raising their awareness, knowledge and skills to collaborate with, support, and implement citizen science.

Co-ordination of and support for citizen science to work towards FAIR (and in many cases open) data should cut across activities. The action should become a key interlocutor between citizen science initiatives and existing thematic databases and infrastructures. It should support - and ‘connect the dots’ between - existing efforts to make citizen science data FAIR and open, make new efforts to liaise between citizen science and infrastructures where they are needed, identify unmet needs, and develop policy recommendations. Overall the action should move citizen science towards open science as its modus operandi.

Underlying these activities should be efforts to reduce disparities in awareness and actual practice of citizen science across disciplines in the ERA (e.g. at local, regional, national and EU levels). Moreover, significant efforts should be made to be inclusive in citizens’ involvement in terms of geography, gender, ethnicity, disability, age, socio-economic background etc. In order to achieve the expected outcomes, international cooperation and mutual learning that promise tangible scientific, societal or policy impacts is advised.

The action should build on and valorise the results of earlier projects in the Science and Society (FP6), Science in Society (FP7) and Science with and for Society (Horizon 2020) programmes, in particular projects focused on public engagement, responsible research and innovation, and citizen science , as well as of national and regional initiatives, and should aim to provide a seamless transition between previous supporting actions and this new action.

Eligibility

To be eligible for funding, applicants must be established in one of the eligible countries, i.e.:

  • the Member States of the European Union, including their outermost regions;
  • the Overseas Countries and Territories (OCTs) linked to the Member States;
  • eligible non-EU countries:
    • countries associated to Horizon Europe
    • low and middle-income countries

At the date of the publication of the work programme, there are no countries associated to Horizon Europe. Considering the Union’s interest to retain, in principle, relations with the countries associated to Horizon 2020, most third countries associated to Horizon 2020 are expected to be associated to Horizon Europe with an intention to secure uninterrupted continuity between Horizon 2020 and Horizon Europe. In addition, other third countries can also become associated to Horizon Europe during the programme. For the purposes of the eligibility conditions, applicants established in Horizon 2020 Associated Countries or in other third countries negotiating association to Horizon Europe will be treated as entities established in an Associated Country, if the Horizon Europe association agreement with the third country concerned applies at the time of signature of the grant agreement

Legal entities which are established in countries not listed above will be eligible for funding if provided for in the specific call conditions, or if their participation is considered essential for implementing the action by the granting authority.

The following exceptions apply: Legal entities established in non-associated third countries may exceptionally participate in this Coordination and support action.

Consortium Composition

Unless otherwise provided for in the specific call conditions, legal entities forming a consortium are eligible to participate in actions provided that the consortium includes:

  • at least one independent legal entity established in a Member State;and
  • at least two other independent legal entities, each established in different Member States or Associated Countries.

Project Duration

The action should be no shorter than 3 years.

Budget

  • Expected EU contribution per project:

The Commission estimates that an EU contribution of around EUR 4.00 million would allow these outcomes to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of a proposal requesting different amounts.

  • Indicative budget:

The total indicative budget for the topic is EUR 4.00 million.

  • Funding rate:

100%

Application Details

See full details in the official call document.

All proposals must be submitted directly online via the Funding & Tenders Portal Electronic Submission System.




Horizon Europe: Cluster 2 - Politics and governance in a post-pandemic world


Horizon Europe is the EU’s key funding programme for research and innovation.

This call aims to examine the impacts of the different “exceptional or crisis politics”, including the invocation of emergency clauses under human rights law, on the constitutional and democratic polity (rule of law, political institutions, political participation, human rights and freedoms).

Deadline: 07 October 2021, 17:00 Brussels time

Application Link Overview Cluster 2, ‘Culture, Creativity and Inclusive Society’ aims to meet EU goals and priorities on enhancing democratic governance and citizens participation, on the safeguarding and promotion of cultural heritage, and to respond to and shape multifaceted social, economic, technological and cultural transformations. Cluster 2 mobilises multidisciplinary expertise of European social sciences and humanities for understanding fundamental contemporary transformations of society, economy, politics and culture. It aims to provide evidence-based policy options for a socially just and inclusive European green and digital transition and recovery. Activities contributing to the destination "Innovative Research on Democracy and Governance", will provide knowledge, data, scientifically robust recommendations to reinvigorate democratic governance and improve trust in democratic institutions. In the long-term, this will contribute to help safeguard fundamental rights to empower active and inclusive citizenship. By doing so, they will also strengthen accountability, transparency, effectiveness and trustworthiness of rule of law-based institutions and policies. Activities will develop recommendations to protect liberties and the rule of law, and shield democracy from multidimensional threats. They will aim to expand political participation, social dialogue and social inclusion, civic engagement and gender equality.

Background

Democracies are more fragile and more vulnerable than in the past. The Freedom in the World Report (2020) shows that democracies across the globe are in crisis1. At the same time, various European surveys show declining levels of trust in the political institutions of democracy.2 In terms of legitimacy, there are signs of a potential shift from governance based on expertise, multilateralism and consensual policymaking towards majoritarianism, unilateralism, nationalism, populism and polarization. Research on the past and present challenges and tensions in democracy can help to better understand and strengthen democracy, its resilience and stability. It will foster democracy’s further development with a view to enhancing representation, participation, openness, pluralism, tolerance, the effectiveness of public policy, non-discrimination, civic engagement, the protection of fundamental rights and the rule of law. These reflect the European Union’s values as defined in Article 2 of the EU Treaty.

Expected impact

Proposals for topics under this Destination should set out a credible pathway to contributing to the following expected impacts of the Horizon Europe Strategic Plan:

  • Democratic governance is reinvigorated by improving the accountability, transparency, effectiveness and trustworthiness of rule-of-law based institutions and policies and through the expansion of active and inclusive citizenship empowered by the safeguarding of fundamental rights.

The implementation of the research activities of the destination will assist in the re-invigoration and modernisation of democratic governance. The aim is to develop evidence-based innovations, policies and policy recommendations, as well as institutional frameworks that expand political participation, social dialogue, civic engagement, gender equality and inclusiveness. Activities will also contribute to enhancing the transparency, effectiveness, accountability and legitimacy of public policy-making. They will help improving trust in democratic institutions, safeguarding liberties and the rule of law and protecting democracy from multidimensional threats. Rich historical, cultural and philosophical perspectives, including a comparative dimension, will set the frame for soundly understanding present developments and help to map future pathways. In the medium to long term, the knowledge, data, scientifically robust recommendations and innovations generated will enhance decision making on all aspects relevant to democratic governance. As the Destination aims directly at citizen engagement and at producing lasting change, it is of particular importance that the research and innovation actions promote the highest standards of transparency and openness. When applicable, it is encouraged to open up the process, criteria, methodologies and data to civil society in the course of the research.

Expected Outcome

Projects should contribute to both of the following expected outcomes:

  • Comparative and historical analysis of the multilevel political impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic crisis, including governance responses.
  • Recommendations, based on normative and empirical approaches, to enhance the capacity of the EU and other democratic institutions, governments and intergovernmental bodies to build responses to global catastrophes based on international collaboration, solidarity, the rule of law and respect of fundamental values and human rights.

Scope

The COVID-19 crisis affects our societies in profound and multifaceted ways. Far beyond the public health threat, the crisis causes economic dislocations, social disruptions and information disorder that test political processes and institutions. In particular, certain measures taken by national governments in the context of states of emergency to contain the virus as fast and effectively as possible represent fundamental challenges to democracy, the rule of law and fundamental rights, including women’s rights. In addition, the crisis also opens opportunities for positive change and innovative new solutions that research actions will help to identify and grasp.

Even if allegedly temporary, derogations from fundamental constitutional checks and balances, individual rights and civil liberties might render liberal democracies permeable to illiberal attitudes and mind frames. In this vein, research should examine the impact of the pandemic on populist and extremist discourses and proposals, and assess whether it has bolstered polarisation and the appeal of authoritarianism or whether, on the contrary, it has provided impetus and momentum for an effective uphold of democratic accountability and judicial control.

Moreover, a stocktaking exercise should allow identifying whether the political trend emerging from the crisis is a demand for greater and improved collaboration and concerted action amongst EU Member States and Associated Countries or, on the contrary, an overall “renationalisation” of the EU and international spheres.

Proposals are expected to address the following: Examine the impacts of the different “exceptional or crisis politics”, including the invocation of emergency clauses under human rights law, on the constitutional and democratic polity (rule of law, political institutions, political participation, human rights and freedoms). A comparative and historical analysis, taking into account the varying approaches followed by the different governments, including the digitalisation of political participation and the respect for human rights and freedoms in the digital sphere, is encouraged. Take stock of the reconfiguration of the geopolitical landscape following the responses and policies put forward by the different actors of the international order. Identify and propose changes and reforms required by the global governance in order to enhance the capacity to cope with and react to similar future crises. In particular, examine and propose “circuit-breaker” mechanisms that could isolate systemic risks early on and prevent them from spreading. Build evidence, including based on past crises, on how international cooperation, at both European and global levels, is a vital tool for national governments to overcome contemporary large-scale crises. Propose ways for the EU and the multilateral system to demonstrate that they can complement and lead national governments’ efforts in contexts of security and health threats. In this respect, the impact on the legitimacy of the EU following on its role and actions during the crisis is of particular interest. Study how governmental and societal responses to the pandemic, including the digitalisation of government and society, have affected trust in public authorities and among groups and individuals in society. This includes research on pandemic-related disinformation and mechanisms to cope with. A comparative analysis of the information flow between science, politics and civil society is encouraged. Proposals should actively engage with a range of stakeholders, such as social partners, civil society, citizens, research practitioners, industry and public authorities. International cooperation is encouraged in order to better achieve the expected outcomes.

Eligibility

Eligible non-EU countries:

  • countries associated to Horizon Europe

At the date of the publication of the work programme, there are no countries associated to Horizon Europe. Considering the Union’s interest to retain, in principle, relations with the countries associated to Horizon 2020, most third countries associated to Horizon 2020 are expected to be associated to Horizon Europe with an intention to secure uninterrupted continuity between Horizon 2020 and Horizon Europe. In addition, other third countries can also become associated to Horizon Europe during the programme. For the purposes of the eligibility conditions, applicants established in Horizon 2020 Associated Countries or in other third countries negotiating association to Horizon Europe will be treated as entities established in an Associated Country, if the Horizon Europe association agreement with the third country concerned applies at the time of signature of the grant agreement.

  • low-and middle-income countries

Legal entities which are established in countries not listed above will be eligible for funding if provided for in the specific call conditions, or if their participation is considered essential for implementing the action by the granting authority.

Specific cases:

  • Affiliated entities - Affiliated entities are eligible for funding if they are established in one of the countries listed above.
  • EU bodies - Legal entities created under EU law may also be eligible to receive funding, unless their basic act states otherwise.
  • International organisations - International European research organisations are eligible to receive funding. Unless their participation is considered essential for implementing the action by the granting authority, other international organisations are not eligible to receive funding. International organisations with headquarters in a Member State or Associated Country are eligible to receive funding for ‘Training and mobility’actions and when provided for in the specific call conditions.

Project Partners

Unless otherwise provided for in the specific call conditions, legal entities forming a consortium are eligible to participate in actions provided that the consortium includes:

  • at least one independent legal entity established in a Member State;and
  • at least two other independent legal entities, each established in different Member States or Associated Countries.

Budget

Expected EU contribution per project

The Commission estimates that an EU contribution of between EUR 2.00 and 3.00 million would allow these outcomes to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of a proposal requesting different amounts.

Indicative budget

The total indicative budget for the topic is EUR 9.90 million.

Funding rate

100%

Application Details

See full details in the official call document.

All proposals must be submitted directly online via the Funding & Tenders Portal Electronic Submission System.




Horizon Europe: Cluster 2 - The future of liberal democracy in Europe


Horizon Europe is the EU’s key funding programme for research and innovation.

This call aims to examine to examine the internal (within nation-states) and external challenges to liberal democracy and the discourses, social structures and institutions that underpin them.

Deadline: 07 October 2021, 17:00 Brussels time

Application Link Overview Cluster 2, ‘Culture, Creativity and Inclusive Society’ aims to meet EU goals and priorities on enhancing democratic governance and citizens participation, on the safeguarding and promotion of cultural heritage, and to respond to and shape multifaceted social, economic, technological and cultural transformations. Cluster 2 mobilises multidisciplinary expertise of European social sciences and humanities for understanding fundamental contemporary transformations of society, economy, politics and culture. It aims to provide evidence-based policy options for a socially just and inclusive European green and digital transition and recovery. Activities contributing to the destination "Innovative Research on Democracy and Governance", will provide knowledge, data, scientifically robust recommendations to reinvigorate democratic governance and improve trust in democratic institutions. In the long-term, this will contribute to help safeguard fundamental rights to empower active and inclusive citizenship. By doing so, they will also strengthen accountability, transparency, effectiveness and trustworthiness of rule of law-based institutions and policies. Activities will develop recommendations to protect liberties and the rule of law, and shield democracy from multidimensional threats. They will aim to expand political participation, social dialogue and social inclusion, civic engagement and gender equality. Background

Democracies are more fragile and more vulnerable than in the past. The Freedom in the World Report (2020) shows that democracies across the globe are in crisis1. At the same time, various European surveys show declining levels of trust in the political institutions of democracy.2 In terms of legitimacy, there are signs of a potential shift from governance based on expertise, multilateralism and consensual policymaking towards majoritarianism, unilateralism, nationalism, populism and polarization. Research on the past and present challenges and tensions in democracy can help to better understand and strengthen democracy, its resilience and stability. It will foster democracy’s further development with a view to enhancing representation, participation, openness, pluralism, tolerance, the effectiveness of public policy, non-discrimination, civic engagement, the protection of fundamental rights and the rule of law. These reflect the European Union’s values as defined in Article 2 of the EU Treaty.

Expected impact

Proposals for topics under this Destination should set out a credible pathway to contributing to the following expected impacts of the Horizon Europe Strategic Plan:

  • Democratic governance is reinvigorated by improving the accountability, transparency, effectiveness and trustworthiness of rule-of-law based institutions and policies and through the expansion of active and inclusive citizenship empowered by the safeguarding of fundamental rights.

The implementation of the research activities of the destination will assist in the re-invigoration and modernisation of democratic governance. The aim is to develop evidence-based innovations, policies and policy recommendations, as well as institutional frameworks that expand political participation, social dialogue, civic engagement, gender equality and inclusiveness. Activities will also contribute to enhancing the transparency, effectiveness, accountability and legitimacy of public policy-making. They will help improving trust in democratic institutions, safeguarding liberties and the rule of law and protecting democracy from multidimensional threats. Rich historical, cultural and philosophical perspectives, including a comparative dimension, will set the frame for soundly understanding present developments and help to map future pathways. In the medium to long term, the knowledge, data, scientifically robust recommendations and innovations generated will enhance decision making on all aspects relevant to democratic governance. As the Destination aims directly at citizen engagement and at producing lasting change, it is of particular importance that the research and innovation actions promote the highest standards of transparency and openness. When applicable, it is encouraged to open up the process, criteria, methodologies and data to civil society in the course of the research.

Expected Outcome

Projects should contribute to all of the following expected outcomes:

  • Produce theoretically and empirically robust visions for the future of liberal democratic institutions.
  • Reflect upon and actualise what liberal democracy means in the 21st century in Europe.
  • Develop recommendations, toolkits, narratives and methodologies to reinstate the legitimacy and effectiveness of liberal democracies.

Scope

European societies are traversed by a multiplicity of identities, attitudes, cultural backgrounds and constitutional traditions. In the face of increasing complexity, certain political forces have promoted a vision of homogeneity, hierarchical control and order. Some extremist and some populist discourses, while not necessarily overlapping, have promoted strict majoritarian and nativist interpretations of democratic governance. Some have been challenging key tenets of liberal democracy like the protection of the rule of law, the separation of powers, women’s and minorities’ rights, etc. altogether or with some variation, providing visions that often conflict with EU priorities. These narratives figure prominently in public discourse and inform public opinion. They influence public views on pluralism and fundamental rights, but also inspire counter discourses and resistance. In addition, populist rhetoric also tends to crystallise in debates about borders and border control, where a tension emerges between the liberal policies of states and the actions called for. Together with the strengthening of the powers of executives, these developments could potentially undermine the stability of democracies. Furthermore, the liberal democratic model is challenged by non-liberal global players, such as China and Russia, and other external factors such as the COVID-19 pandemic and climate crisis. These external challenges paint a poor picture of democracies’ ability to solve collective problems in comparison to other actors, while disconnecting economic and political power from democracy on the global stage. A philosophic, sociological, legal, economic, historical and political reflection is needed on the foundations of liberal democratic governance in order to establish a viable conception of liberal democracy for the future.

Proposals are expected to address some of the following points: To examine the internal (within nation-states) and external challenges to liberal democracy and the discourses, social structures and institutions that underpin them. They should illustrate how such discourses depict social and political subjects as well as the structure of modern societies and institutions. How do these counter basic tenets of liberal democracy? When and why are they successful, or not? Long-term trends in the functioning of key elements of European liberal democracies (fundamental and human rights of individuals – such as freedom of expression, of assembly, of non-discrimination –, the rule of law, pluralism, separation of powers, access to justice, the independence of the judiciary and the media, protection of minorities, right to asylum, etc.) and their public legitimacy should be analysed and compared. Proposals may want to relate these to the impacts of major political and economic challenges of the past decades (e.g. the Great Recession, Cold War, dislocation of empires, “war on terror”, large inflows of mixed migration, the recent pandemic, etc.). The potential tension between liberal, egalitarian and other ideals held by citizens or promoted by political movements can also be examined. Proposals should analyse how institutional and political mechanisms built into European liberal democracies have functioned as limits and as a response to illiberal developments (e.g. checks and balances, enforcement of the rule of law). They should also examine how these mechanisms have evolved in recent years as a response to new threats. Research may provide theoretically rigorous and normatively informed reflections on how political liberalism can be actualised in order to take on the discourses that challenge liberal democracy. Finally, proposals should show the corresponding implications for the institutions of democratic governance.

Eligibility

Eligible non-EU countries:

  • countries associated to Horizon Europe

At the date of the publication of the work programme, there are no countries associated to Horizon Europe. Considering the Union’s interest to retain, in principle, relations with the countries associated to Horizon 2020, most third countries associated to Horizon 2020 are expected to be associated to Horizon Europe with an intention to secure uninterrupted continuity between Horizon 2020 and Horizon Europe. In addition, other third countries can also become associated to Horizon Europe during the programme. For the purposes of the eligibility conditions, applicants established in Horizon 2020 Associated Countries or in other third countries negotiating association to Horizon Europe will be treated as entities established in an Associated Country, if the Horizon Europe association agreement with the third country concerned applies at the time of signature of the grant agreement.

  • low-and middle-income countries

Legal entities which are established in countries not listed above will be eligible for funding if provided for in the specific call conditions, or if their participation is considered essential for implementing the action by the granting authority.

Specific cases:

  • Affiliated entities - Affiliated entities are eligible for funding if they are established in one of the countries listed above.
  • EU bodies - Legal entities created under EU law may also be eligible to receive funding, unless their basic act states otherwise.
  • International organisations - International European research organisations are eligible to receive funding. Unless their participation is considered essential for implementing the action by the granting authority, other international organisations are not eligible to receive funding. International organisations with headquarters in a Member State or Associated Country are eligible to receive funding for ‘Training and mobility’actions and when provided for in the specific call conditions.

Project Partners

Unless otherwise provided for in the specific call conditions, legal entities forming a consortium are eligible to participate in actions provided that the consortium includes:

  • at least one independent legal entity established in a Member State;and
  • at least two other independent legal entities, each established in different Member States or Associated Countries.

Budget

Expected EU contribution per project

The Commission estimates that an EU contribution of between EUR 2.00 and 3.00 million would allow these outcomes to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of a proposal requesting different amounts.

Indicative budget

The total indicative budget for the topic is EUR 9.90 million.

Funding rate

100%

Application Details

See full details in the official call document.

All proposals must be submitted directly online via the Funding & Tenders Portal Electronic Submission System.




Horizon Europe: Cluster 2 - Economic models and modern democracies


Horizon Europe is the EU’s key funding programme for research and innovation.

This call aims to study the interrelationship between politics, people’s participation, culture and economics in modern European democracies across time.

Deadline: 07 October 2021, 17:00 Brussels time

Application Link Overview Cluster 2, ‘Culture, Creativity and Inclusive Society’ aims to meet EU goals and priorities on enhancing democratic governance and citizens participation, on the safeguarding and promotion of cultural heritage, and to respond to and shape multifaceted social, economic, technological and cultural transformations. Cluster 2 mobilises multidisciplinary expertise of European social sciences and humanities for understanding fundamental contemporary transformations of society, economy, politics and culture. It aims to provide evidence-based policy options for a socially just and inclusive European green and digital transition and recovery. Activities contributing to the destination "Innovative Research on Democracy and Governance", will provide knowledge, data, scientifically robust recommendations to reinvigorate democratic governance and improve trust in democratic institutions. In the long-term, this will contribute to help safeguard fundamental rights to empower active and inclusive citizenship. By doing so, they will also strengthen accountability, transparency, effectiveness and trustworthiness of rule of law-based institutions and policies. Activities will develop recommendations to protect liberties and the rule of law, and shield democracy from multidimensional threats. They will aim to expand political participation, social dialogue and social inclusion, civic engagement and gender equality. Background

Democracies are more fragile and more vulnerable than in the past. The Freedom in the World Report (2020) shows that democracies across the globe are in crisis1. At the same time, various European surveys show declining levels of trust in the political institutions of democracy.2 In terms of legitimacy, there are signs of a potential shift from governance based on expertise, multilateralism and consensual policymaking towards majoritarianism, unilateralism, nationalism, populism and polarization. Research on the past and present challenges and tensions in democracy can help to better understand and strengthen democracy, its resilience and stability. It will foster democracy’s further development with a view to enhancing representation, participation, openness, pluralism, tolerance, the effectiveness of public policy, non-discrimination, civic engagement, the protection of fundamental rights and the rule of law. These reflect the European Union’s values as defined in Article 2 of the EU Treaty.

Expected impact

Proposals for topics under this Destination should set out a credible pathway to contributing to the following expected impacts of the Horizon Europe Strategic Plan:

  • Democratic governance is reinvigorated by improving the accountability, transparency, effectiveness and trustworthiness of rule-of-law based institutions and policies and through the expansion of active and inclusive citizenship empowered by the safeguarding of fundamental rights.

The implementation of the research activities of the destination will assist in the re-invigoration and modernisation of democratic governance. The aim is to develop evidence-based innovations, policies and policy recommendations, as well as institutional frameworks that expand political participation, social dialogue, civic engagement, gender equality and inclusiveness. Activities will also contribute to enhancing the transparency, effectiveness, accountability and legitimacy of public policy-making. They will help improving trust in democratic institutions, safeguarding liberties and the rule of law and protecting democracy from multidimensional threats. Rich historical, cultural and philosophical perspectives, including a comparative dimension, will set the frame for soundly understanding present developments and help to map future pathways. In the medium to long term, the knowledge, data, scientifically robust recommendations and innovations generated will enhance decision making on all aspects relevant to democratic governance. As the Destination aims directly at citizen engagement and at producing lasting change, it is of particular importance that the research and innovation actions promote the highest standards of transparency and openness. When applicable, it is encouraged to open up the process, criteria, methodologies and data to civil society in the course of the research.

Expected Outcome

Projects are expected to contribute to the following expected outcome:

  • Theoretically and empirically robust recommendations aiming to instil greater democratic accountability and inclusion in economic processes.

Scope

Since WWII, substantial progress has been made in Europe in terms of economic development, improving life conditions and allowing (and enabling) the consolidation of liberal democracies. However, in recent decades the intensification of economic globalisation, market de-regulation and the financialisation of economies have posed new challenges to democratic governance. Global corporatised and financialised capitalism has created dynamic economic systems that produce material wealth but at the same time pose challenges to democracy, fundamental rights, social inclusion, reversing inequalities (including gender inequality), welfare, as well as the sustainability of our ecological system and climate change. On the other hand, alternative business models (e.g. social economy organisations and social enterprises) have emerged in reaction to this evolution. They operate on the basis of democratic and participatory principles and prioritise their societal mission over their profits.

Proposals are expected to address some of the following points: To study the interrelationship between politics, people’s participation, culture and economics in modern European democracies across time. In this vein, to comparatively analyse the role of various democratic institutional configurations and actors in mitigating the negative effects of economic activity on society and on democratic processes, while promoting inclusive and sustainable growth. How can democratic politics exercise control over the economic logic? How can re-embedding democracy and (the various forms of) capitalism be envisaged? How do economic actors, such as corporations, influence the democratic process? Through what channels (political parties, media, sponsorship, etc.)? What is the real impact of corporate lobbying on the democratic process? Research may study trends in capital accumulation and distribution, especially in new digital and creative industries, and the impacts they have on the functioning of democracies. Proposals should examine legal, social, economic, organisational and financial innovations that could make corporations more inclusive, accountable and conducive to social fairness and environmental sustainability, while preserving their innovation and flexibility. What would be the legitimate level of democratic governance over the economy (local, national, supranational)? In which ways can business corporations be held responsible to respect human rights? What kind of institutional mechanisms could guide the interaction of the various governance levels? Alternative economic models (including social economy organisations and social enterprises) and new models of corporate governance can be studied, in which case their success in fostering inclusive economic growth, enhancing democratic participation and improving environmental sustainability should be evaluated. Finally, proposal are encouraged to identify social innovation policies that would support such new governance models.

Eligibility

Eligible non-EU countries:

  • countries associated to Horizon Europe

At the date of the publication of the work programme, there are no countries associated to Horizon Europe. Considering the Union’s interest to retain, in principle, relations with the countries associated to Horizon 2020, most third countries associated to Horizon 2020 are expected to be associated to Horizon Europe with an intention to secure uninterrupted continuity between Horizon 2020 and Horizon Europe. In addition, other third countries can also become associated to Horizon Europe during the programme. For the purposes of the eligibility conditions, applicants established in Horizon 2020 Associated Countries or in other third countries negotiating association to Horizon Europe will be treated as entities established in an Associated Country, if the Horizon Europe association agreement with the third country concerned applies at the time of signature of the grant agreement.

  • low-and middle-income countries

Legal entities which are established in countries not listed above will be eligible for funding if provided for in the specific call conditions, or if their participation is considered essential for implementing the action by the granting authority.

Specific cases:

  • Affiliated entities - Affiliated entities are eligible for funding if they are established in one of the countries listed above.
  • EU bodies - Legal entities created under EU law may also be eligible to receive funding, unless their basic act states otherwise.
  • International organisations - International European research organisations are eligible to receive funding. Unless their participation is considered essential for implementing the action by the granting authority, other international organisations are not eligible to receive funding. International organisations with headquarters in a Member State or Associated Country are eligible to receive funding for ‘Training and mobility’actions and when provided for in the specific call conditions.

Project Partners

Unless otherwise provided for in the specific call conditions, legal entities forming a consortium are eligible to participate in actions provided that the consortium includes:

  • at least one independent legal entity established in a Member State;and
  • at least two other independent legal entities, each established in different Member States or Associated Countries.

Budget

Expected EU contribution per project

The Commission estimates that an EU contribution of between EUR 2.00 and 3.00 million would allow these outcomes to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of a proposal requesting different amounts.

Indicative budget

The total indicative budget for the topic is EUR 9.90 million.

Funding rate

100%

Application Details

See full details in the official call document.

All proposals must be submitted directly online via the Funding & Tenders Portal Electronic Submission System.




Horizon Europe: Cluster 2 - Democratic politics in the EU’s neighbourhood


Horizon Europe is the EU’s key funding programme for research and innovation.

This call aims to take stock of developments in democracy building or failure in the EU’s neighbourhood countries.

Deadline: 07 October 2021, 17:00 Brussels time

Application Link Overview Cluster 2, ‘Culture, Creativity and Inclusive Society’ aims to meet EU goals and priorities on enhancing democratic governance and citizens participation, on the safeguarding and promotion of cultural heritage, and to respond to and shape multifaceted social, economic, technological and cultural transformations. Cluster 2 mobilises multidisciplinary expertise of European social sciences and humanities for understanding fundamental contemporary transformations of society, economy, politics and culture. It aims to provide evidence-based policy options for a socially just and inclusive European green and digital transition and recovery. Activities contributing to the destination "Innovative Research on Democracy and Governance", will provide knowledge, data, scientifically robust recommendations to reinvigorate democratic governance and improve trust in democratic institutions. In the long-term, this will contribute to help safeguard fundamental rights to empower active and inclusive citizenship. By doing so, they will also strengthen accountability, transparency, effectiveness and trustworthiness of rule of law-based institutions and policies. Activities will develop recommendations to protect liberties and the rule of law, and shield democracy from multidimensional threats. They will aim to expand political participation, social dialogue and social inclusion, civic engagement and gender equality. Background

Democracies are more fragile and more vulnerable than in the past. The Freedom in the World Report (2020) shows that democracies across the globe are in crisis1. At the same time, various European surveys show declining levels of trust in the political institutions of democracy.2 In terms of legitimacy, there are signs of a potential shift from governance based on expertise, multilateralism and consensual policymaking towards majoritarianism, unilateralism, nationalism, populism and polarization. Research on the past and present challenges and tensions in democracy can help to better understand and strengthen democracy, its resilience and stability. It will foster democracy’s further development with a view to enhancing representation, participation, openness, pluralism, tolerance, the effectiveness of public policy, non-discrimination, civic engagement, the protection of fundamental rights and the rule of law. These reflect the European Union’s values as defined in Article 2 of the EU Treaty.

Expected impact

Proposals for topics under this Destination should set out a credible pathway to contributing to the following expected impacts of the Horizon Europe Strategic Plan:

  • Democratic governance is reinvigorated by improving the accountability, transparency, effectiveness and trustworthiness of rule-of-law based institutions and policies and through the expansion of active and inclusive citizenship empowered by the safeguarding of fundamental rights.

The implementation of the research activities of the destination will assist in the re-invigoration and modernisation of democratic governance. The aim is to develop evidence-based innovations, policies and policy recommendations, as well as institutional frameworks that expand political participation, social dialogue, civic engagement, gender equality and inclusiveness. Activities will also contribute to enhancing the transparency, effectiveness, accountability and legitimacy of public policy-making. They will help improving trust in democratic institutions, safeguarding liberties and the rule of law and protecting democracy from multidimensional threats. Rich historical, cultural and philosophical perspectives, including a comparative dimension, will set the frame for soundly understanding present developments and help to map future pathways. In the medium to long term, the knowledge, data, scientifically robust recommendations and innovations generated will enhance decision making on all aspects relevant to democratic governance. As the Destination aims directly at citizen engagement and at producing lasting change, it is of particular importance that the research and innovation actions promote the highest standards of transparency and openness. When applicable, it is encouraged to open up the process, criteria, methodologies and data to civil society in the course of the research.

Expected Outcome

Projects should contribute to at least two of the following expected outcomes:

  • Comprehensive stocktaking of developments over the last decade, so that the European Union’s democracy support efforts can both regain traction and be revamped where necessary.
  • Development of an improved policy toolkit for supporting liberal democracy in the European Union’s neighbourhood, paving the way for more stability and cooperation.
  • Evidence base for the mid-term review of the implementation of the Action Plan for Human Rights and Democracy 2020-2024.
  • Reflection on the European Union’s aspiration and role in supporting democracy in its neighbourhood.

Scope

Since the EU Council conclusions of 2009, EU democracy support has evolved and has been fine-tuned, with advances and setbacks. Following the adoption of the EU strategic framework on human rights and democracy in 2012, the EU adopted three Action Plans in order to implement its commitments and reach its goals. The current Action Plan covers years 2020-20247.

Despite the hopes raised by the ‘colour revolutions’ in Eastern Europe in the 2000s and the Arab Spring in 2011 as boosters of democratisation in the European neighbourhood, a more troubling reality persists: some democratic advances coexist with the continued persistence of authoritarian rule in Eastern Europe, the Middle East and North African countries. Research should assess the EU’s actual role in promoting democracy. It should examine the EU’s influence on political governance in the neighbourhood, its capacity to react and address potential gaps between the declared intentions, and the results and consequences of its democracy support policies. Critical reflection should facilitate understanding of the dynamics, including opposition to the EU’s democratic efforts in the neighbourhood. Such an overarching assessment should contribute to innovations in democratisation policies corresponding to the realities on the ground.

Proposals are expected to address some of the following points: To take stock of developments in democracy building or failure in the EU’s neighbourhood countries. Research should draw lessons as regards success factors and barriers (political, economic, social, cultural, etc.) in the different regional, national and supranational contexts. The role of third country actors like the United States of America, China, Russia and their impact on democratisation processes or the entrenchment of authoritarianism should be examined. Similarly, the interplay of security and stability considerations and democratisation support in the EU’s agenda and actions should be analysed. Proposals should also assess the mechanisms the EU uses to support political change, as well as examine the discourses and narratives it employs and the actors it targets. They are expected to collect reliable and comparable data on funding for democracy, human rights, gender equality, the rule of law and good governance support, in order to build an account of the outcomes of a decade’s efforts, and thus facilitate learning and improvement. International cooperation with partners from countries in the EU’s neighbourhood is strongly encouraged.

Eligibility

Eligible non-EU countries:

  • countries associated to Horizon Europe

At the date of the publication of the work programme, there are no countries associated to Horizon Europe. Considering the Union’s interest to retain, in principle, relations with the countries associated to Horizon 2020, most third countries associated to Horizon 2020 are expected to be associated to Horizon Europe with an intention to secure uninterrupted continuity between Horizon 2020 and Horizon Europe. In addition, other third countries can also become associated to Horizon Europe during the programme. For the purposes of the eligibility conditions, applicants established in Horizon 2020 Associated Countries or in other third countries negotiating association to Horizon Europe will be treated as entities established in an Associated Country, if the Horizon Europe association agreement with the third country concerned applies at the time of signature of the grant agreement.

  • low-and middle-income countries

Legal entities which are established in countries not listed above will be eligible for funding if provided for in the specific call conditions, or if their participation is considered essential for implementing the action by the granting authority.

Specific cases:

  • Affiliated entities - Affiliated entities are eligible for funding if they are established in one of the countries listed above.
  • EU bodies - Legal entities created under EU law may also be eligible to receive funding, unless their basic act states otherwise.
  • International organisations - International European research organisations are eligible to receive funding. Unless their participation is considered essential for implementing the action by the granting authority, other international organisations are not eligible to receive funding. International organisations with headquarters in a Member State or Associated Country are eligible to receive funding for ‘Training and mobility’actions and when provided for in the specific call conditions.

Project Partners

Unless otherwise provided for in the specific call conditions, legal entities forming a consortium are eligible to participate in actions provided that the consortium includes:

  • at least one independent legal entity established in a Member State;and
  • at least two other independent legal entities, each established in different Member States or Associated Countries.

Budget

Expected EU contribution per project

The Commission estimates that an EU contribution of between EUR 2.00 and 3.00 million would allow these outcomes to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of a proposal requesting different amounts.

Indicative budget

The total indicative budget for the topic is EUR 9.90 million.

Funding rate

100%

Application Details

See full details in the official call document.

All proposals must be submitted directly online via the Funding & Tenders Portal Electronic Submission System.




Horizon Europe: Cluster 2 - New ways of participatory management and sustainable financing of museums and other cultural institutions


Horizon Europe is the EU’s key funding programme for research and innovation.

This call aims to explore ways to mitigate the challenges that museums, other cultural institutions and the entire ecosystem around them are facing nowadays, including the social and economic impact of the coronavirus pandemic.

Deadline: 07 October 2021, 17:00 Brussels time

Application Link Overview Cluster 2, ‘Culture, Creativity and Inclusive Society’ aims to meet EU goals and priorities on enhancing democratic governance and citizens participation, on the safeguarding and promotion of cultural heritage, and to respond to and shape multifaceted social, economic, technological and cultural transformations. Cluster 2 mobilises multidisciplinary expertise of European social sciences and humanities for understanding fundamental contemporary transformations of society, economy, politics and culture. It aims to provide evidence-based policy options for a socially just and inclusive European green and digital transition and recovery. Activities contributing to the destination "Innovative Research on the European Cultural Heritage and the Cultural and Creative Industries", will promote better access and engagement with cultural heritage and improve its protection, enhancement and restoration. Research and innovation will support sustainable growth and job creation through the cultural and creative industries and contribute to integrate them into the European industrial policy as drivers for innovation and competitiveness. Background

Europe’s rich cultural heritage, with its common values, its wealth of monuments and sites and its creative diversity of traditions, crafts, arts, architecture, literature, languages, theatre, films and music, not only reflects our past but also shapes our present and builds our future. It is a creative way of cultivating independent thinking and dialogue, while promoting our interests across the world. Access to experience with cultural heritage contributes to social cohesion and inclusion, by strengthening resilience and the sense of belonging, bringing people together and improving well-being.

Europe’s common research and innovation (R&I) action to protect, conserve, restore and repair its important cultural heritage, promote its use as one of the substantial European resources, boost its traditional and contemporary arts and create wider awareness is still limited in scope and impact. Moreover, European tangible and intangible cultural heritage is increasingly facing a number of challenges such as deterioration due to climate change, pollution, natural or man-made disasters, looting and illicit trafficking, lack of finance or insufficient valorisation. In addition, Europe’s cultural production (in particular film and music) lags behind in international competitiveness despite its high quality and quantity.

European R&I activities will make a strong contribution in all these areas by strengthening our common knowledge and expertise, as well as by providing solid evidence for policy-making. They will promote and valorise our cultural heritage and arts, while increasing their international competitiveness and firming the social fabric at European, national, regional or local level. Through a broad co-operation of a wide set of stakeholders and efficient coordination between EU Member States, R&I activities will be oriented towards interdisciplinary research and actively involve the cultural and creative industries (CCIs)17. They will connect cultural heritage with the CCIs by supporting new forms of cultural and artistic expression that build on existing cultural assets and provide access to both tangible and intangible heritage. R&I will also promote the competitiveness of cultural and creative industries. It will provide evidence about their role as innovation drivers in the wider economy. In line with the Commission priorities, the R&I activities of this Destination will help promote the European way of life, contribute to achieving the Green Deal goals and support an economy that works for people. They will also contribute to the New European Bauhaus initiative, to realising the UN Sustainable Development Goals and to building a stronger crisis-resilient society and economy by taking into account experiences, challenges and lessons learnt also from the COVID-19 pandemic.

Concretely, R&I activities under this Destination and its calls will support these policy objectives by monitoring, safeguarding and transmitting cultural heritage, fostering the CCIs and promoting cultural diversity. They will aim at protecting historical sites and monuments, artefacts, heritage sites, cultural landscapes, museums and other cultural institutions, languages, customs, traditions and values. Through new or existing cutting-edge conservation and restoration technologies and methods, they will help restore and preserve monuments and artefacts in a green way. They will advance the protection of cultural heritage from natural hazards and anthropogenic threats, including the looting and illicit trafficking of cultural goods. Research and innovation across the cultural and creative sectors will foster their inbuilt innovation potential and will promote transformation in many parts of the economy and social development across Europe. Through new approaches, R&I will offer innovative, integrated, sustainable and participative management and business models for museums and other cultural institutions, with a view to spur inclusive growth, jobs, social cohesion and diversity. It will also contribute to develop a sustainable and quality-driven intervention on built environment in line with the New European Bauhaus initiative. Research in old and new forms of cultural and artistic expression will promote intercultural cooperation, while engaging citizens and young people. It will valorise traditional skills and the reuse of existing assets. Exploring the economic role of CCIs and investigating the impact of creative and artistic intervention into innovation processes will provide capacities to boost Europe’s competitiveness. European cultural heritage, arts and creativity can be harnessed to further develop the design and identity of products, and to shape the public image of our countries and regions. Cultural and intellectual experiences can be marketed at a premium: CCIs are at the frontline of this action, by investing in knowledge and creativity. Furthermore, the use of existing and the development of new digital methodologies will offer innovative approaches to share and increase access to and engagement with cultural heritage. Altogether, these actions will enable real cooperation and participation of a wide range of communities, including stakeholders, citizens and industry.

Through all these activities, research and innovation will underpin the European Union’s leading role in protecting, preserving and enhancing Europe’s cultural heritage and scale-up the competitiveness of its cultural and creative industries.

Proposals under this destination should consider and promote in a cross-cutting way, and whenever appropriate and applicable:

  • The use of digital and cutting-edge technologies;
  • An active and sustainable engagement with stakeholders, social innovators and citizens;
  • The active involvement of local, regional or national authorities and sectoral social partners, particularly in the uptake and implementation of research results and recommendations;
  • A clear strategy for the uptake of research outcomes, recommendations or results, in particular where CCIs are participating or are concerned;
  • Training and education activities for targeted groups of users and/or stakeholders;
  • A robust plan for how projects will use or build on outputs and results from research already undertaken and technology already available;
  • Increased participation of CCIs, SMEs and industry;
  • Lessons learnt from the COVID-19 crisis in view of a sustainable management of the post-crisis society;
  • Contribution to the European Green Deal, the New European Bauhaus as well as the Sustainable Development Goals.

Expected impacts

Proposals for topics under this Destination should set out a credible pathway to contributing to the following expected impact of the Horizon Europe Strategic Plan:

The full potential of cultural heritage, arts and cultural and creative sectors as a driver of sustainable innovation and a European sense of belonging is realised through a continuous engagement with society, citizens and economic sectors as well as through better protection, restoration and promotion of cultural heritage.

Expected Outcome

Projects should contribute to at least two of the following expected outcomes:

  • Explore new ways of participatory cultural management and sustainable financing for museums and other cultural institutions, in particular during and after times of crises such as the coronavirus pandemic.
  • Ensure better access to cultural heritage and engagement with local communities, to preserve and strengthen social cohesion through inclusive and participatory procedures.
  • Strengthen the sense of belonging to a common European space while respecting cultural and ethnolinguistic diversity, as well as developing an awareness of cultural pluralism.
  • Promote the role of museums and other cultural institutions in well-being, health, resilience, social inclusion and society’s dealing with trauma and post-crisis recovery.
  • Foster the role of museums and other cultural institutions in sustainable economic growth and regional development.

Scope

Museums and other cultural institutions (such as libraries, galleries, archives, memorial sites, etc.) play a key-role in social inclusion and cohesion. They create the sense of belonging, build shared identities, promote cultural awareness and historical reflection, improve people’s well-being and contribute to sustainable development and growth at local, regional and national level. Nowadays, museums and other cultural institutions are facing several challenges such as scarce funding, new legal obligations with regard to their collections (e.g. related to intellectual property rights), insufficient numbers of visitors or, to the other extreme, massive tourist crowds, which necessitate new and expensive conservation means and security tools. All these challenges are threatening the existence and efficient work of museums and other cultural institutions.

Adding to the aforementioned challenges, the lockdown during the COVID-19 pandemic has heavily affected museums, other cultural institutions, arts and the entire ecosystem around them. Museums closed down for months, leaving staff unemployed and putting at risk cultural goods, as forced closing and absence of curators can severely impact the conservation and safety of collections.

On the other hand, cultural institutions have demonstrated great resilience and creativity in communicating with their publics remotely during the COVID-19 pandemic. Notwithstanding the general lockdown, the cultural sector, fully aware of the important role of culture, immediately mobilised itself to maintain activities and ease people’s feeling of isolation. Using digital technology and artificial intelligence, museums, other cultural institutions and artists offered new possibilities to access heritage and knowledge by participating in online cultural events, developed new creative business models and provided new training and capacity-building programmes to support cultural circles, and strengthened their presence in the internet and social media.

In light of the post-COVID era, museums and other cultural institutions will need to be the agents of a truly holistic and inclusive revival, as well as the developers of the new normality. They will be called to give people a sense that their life is no longer in abeyance, help to keep up the morale and be essential markers of people’s re-engagement with their cultural heritage. Therefore, there is a pressing need to ensure methods of sustainable financing in order to help museums and other cultural institutions recover quickly, continue operate in a safe and viable way and widen as much as possible access to citizens. Although the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic as far as economic losses and jobs are concerned cannot be fully predicted yet, international organisations, such as the UNESCO, ICOM, NeMO and OECD provide already recommendations for measures to be put in place. Furthermore, national authorities have started allocating recovery funds that could also benefit the cultural institutions’ sector. However, these measures are only partial, short-term solutions and do not solve the sector’s structural financing issues. Signals from the sector indicate that in particular smaller, local museums without (or with limited) structural governmental funding, suffer disproportionally.

Therefore, R&I proposals under this topic should explore ways to mitigate the challenges that museums, other cultural institutions and the entire ecosystem around them are facing nowadays, including the social and economic impact of the coronavirus pandemic. They should provide methods and models to sustainably finance cultural institutions, while ensuring equal and wide access to culture, heritage and cultural goods. Emphasis should be put on the role of local museums and new ways of participatory cultural management to help museums and other cultural institutions become fully embedded in cities’ life, taking also into account the differences between metropolis and small towns. A digital strategy might be developed as part of the new management and financing model, including sustainable ways of sharing knowledge and facilities to communicate through and about objects and collections of both tangible and intangible cultural heritage. Proposals are encouraged to include close interaction with local, regional and national communities and authorities, as well as cooperation with research institutions and the cultural and creative stakeholders (e.g. artists, actors, interpretation specialists, designers) to attract and engage the public and in particular young people.

Eligibility

Eligible non-EU countries:

  • countries associated to Horizon Europe

At the date of the publication of the work programme, there are no countries associated to Horizon Europe. Considering the Union’s interest to retain, in principle, relations with the countries associated to Horizon 2020, most third countries associated to Horizon 2020 are expected to be associated to Horizon Europe with an intention to secure uninterrupted continuity between Horizon 2020 and Horizon Europe. In addition, other third countries can also become associated to Horizon Europe during the programme. For the purposes of the eligibility conditions, applicants established in Horizon 2020 Associated Countries or in other third countries negotiating association to Horizon Europe will be treated as entities established in an Associated Country, if the Horizon Europe association agreement with the third country concerned applies at the time of signature of the grant agreement.

  • low-and middle-income countries

Legal entities which are established in countries not listed above will be eligible for funding if provided for in the specific call conditions, or if their participation is considered essential for implementing the action by the granting authority.

Specific cases:

  • Affiliated entities - Affiliated entities are eligible for funding if they are established in one of the countries listed above.
  • EU bodies - Legal entities created under EU law may also be eligible to receive funding, unless their basic act states otherwise.
  • International organisations - International European research organisations are eligible to receive funding. Unless their participation is considered essential for implementing the action by the granting authority, other international organisations are not eligible to receive funding. International organisations with headquarters in a Member State or Associated Country are eligible to receive funding for ‘Training and mobility’actions and when provided for in the specific call conditions.

Project Partners

Unless otherwise provided for in the specific call conditions, legal entities forming a consortium are eligible to participate in actions provided that the consortium includes:

  • at least one independent legal entity established in a Member State;and
  • at least two other independent legal entities, each established in different Member States or Associated Countries.

Budget

Expected EU contribution per project

The Commission estimates that an EU contribution of between EUR 2.00 and 3.00 million would allow these outcomes to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of a proposal requesting different amounts.

Indicative budget

The total indicative budget for the topic is EUR 9.00 million.

Funding rate

100%

Application Details

See full details in the official call document.

All proposals must be submitted directly online via the Funding & Tenders Portal Electronic Submission System.




Horizon Europe: Cluster 2 - Green technologies and materials for cultural heritage


Horizon Europe is the EU’s key funding programme for research and innovation.

This call aims to bring together basic and applied research, social, cultural and entrepreneurial innovation through the involvement of cultural and creative sectors to ensure sustainability.

Deadline: 07 October 2021, 17:00 Brussels time

Application Link Overview Cluster 2, ‘Culture, Creativity and Inclusive Society’ aims to meet EU goals and priorities on enhancing democratic governance and citizens participation, on the safeguarding and promotion of cultural heritage, and to respond to and shape multifaceted social, economic, technological and cultural transformations. Cluster 2 mobilises multidisciplinary expertise of European social sciences and humanities for understanding fundamental contemporary transformations of society, economy, politics and culture. It aims to provide evidence-based policy options for a socially just and inclusive European green and digital transition and recovery. Activities contributing to the destination "Innovative Research on the European Cultural Heritage and the Cultural and Creative Industries", will promote better access and engagement with cultural heritage and improve its protection, enhancement and restoration. Research and innovation will support sustainable growth and job creation through the cultural and creative industries and contribute to integrate them into the European industrial policy as drivers for innovation and competitiveness. Background

Europe’s rich cultural heritage, with its common values, its wealth of monuments and sites and its creative diversity of traditions, crafts, arts, architecture, literature, languages, theatre, films and music, not only reflects our past but also shapes our present and builds our future. It is a creative way of cultivating independent thinking and dialogue, while promoting our interests across the world. Access to experience with cultural heritage contributes to social cohesion and inclusion, by strengthening resilience and the sense of belonging, bringing people together and improving well-being.

Europe’s common research and innovation (R&I) action to protect, conserve, restore and repair its important cultural heritage, promote its use as one of the substantial European resources, boost its traditional and contemporary arts and create wider awareness is still limited in scope and impact. Moreover, European tangible and intangible cultural heritage is increasingly facing a number of challenges such as deterioration due to climate change, pollution, natural or man-made disasters, looting and illicit trafficking, lack of finance or insufficient valorisation. In addition, Europe’s cultural production (in particular film and music) lags behind in international competitiveness despite its high quality and quantity.

European R&I activities will make a strong contribution in all these areas by strengthening our common knowledge and expertise, as well as by providing solid evidence for policy-making. They will promote and valorise our cultural heritage and arts, while increasing their international competitiveness and firming the social fabric at European, national, regional or local level. Through a broad co-operation of a wide set of stakeholders and efficient coordination between EU Member States, R&I activities will be oriented towards interdisciplinary research and actively involve the cultural and creative industries (CCIs)17. They will connect cultural heritage with the CCIs by supporting new forms of cultural and artistic expression that build on existing cultural assets and provide access to both tangible and intangible heritage. R&I will also promote the competitiveness of cultural and creative industries. It will provide evidence about their role as innovation drivers in the wider economy. In line with the Commission priorities, the R&I activities of this Destination will help promote the European way of life, contribute to achieving the Green Deal goals and support an economy that works for people. They will also contribute to the New European Bauhaus initiative, to realising the UN Sustainable Development Goals and to building a stronger crisis-resilient society and economy by taking into account experiences, challenges and lessons learnt also from the COVID-19 pandemic.

Concretely, R&I activities under this Destination and its calls will support these policy objectives by monitoring, safeguarding and transmitting cultural heritage, fostering the CCIs and promoting cultural diversity. They will aim at protecting historical sites and monuments, artefacts, heritage sites, cultural landscapes, museums and other cultural institutions, languages, customs, traditions and values. Through new or existing cutting-edge conservation and restoration technologies and methods, they will help restore and preserve monuments and artefacts in a green way. They will advance the protection of cultural heritage from natural hazards and anthropogenic threats, including the looting and illicit trafficking of cultural goods. Research and innovation across the cultural and creative sectors will foster their inbuilt innovation potential and will promote transformation in many parts of the economy and social development across Europe. Through new approaches, R&I will offer innovative, integrated, sustainable and participative management and business models for museums and other cultural institutions, with a view to spur inclusive growth, jobs, social cohesion and diversity. It will also contribute to develop a sustainable and quality-driven intervention on built environment in line with the New European Bauhaus initiative. Research in old and new forms of cultural and artistic expression will promote intercultural cooperation, while engaging citizens and young people. It will valorise traditional skills and the reuse of existing assets. Exploring the economic role of CCIs and investigating the impact of creative and artistic intervention into innovation processes will provide capacities to boost Europe’s competitiveness. European cultural heritage, arts and creativity can be harnessed to further develop the design and identity of products, and to shape the public image of our countries and regions. Cultural and intellectual experiences can be marketed at a premium: CCIs are at the frontline of this action, by investing in knowledge and creativity. Furthermore, the use of existing and the development of new digital methodologies will offer innovative approaches to share and increase access to and engagement with cultural heritage. Altogether, these actions will enable real cooperation and participation of a wide range of communities, including stakeholders, citizens and industry.

Through all these activities, research and innovation will underpin the European Union’s leading role in protecting, preserving and enhancing Europe’s cultural heritage and scale-up the competitiveness of its cultural and creative industries.

Proposals under this destination should consider and promote in a cross-cutting way, and whenever appropriate and applicable:

  • The use of digital and cutting-edge technologies;
  • An active and sustainable engagement with stakeholders, social innovators and citizens;
  • The active involvement of local, regional or national authorities and sectoral social partners, particularly in the uptake and implementation of research results and recommendations;
  • A clear strategy for the uptake of research outcomes, recommendations or results, in particular where CCIs are participating or are concerned;
  • Training and education activities for targeted groups of users and/or stakeholders;
  • A robust plan for how projects will use or build on outputs and results from research already undertaken and technology already available;
  • Increased participation of CCIs, SMEs and industry;
  • Lessons learnt from the COVID-19 crisis in view of a sustainable management of the post-crisis society;
  • Contribution to the European Green Deal, the New European Bauhaus as well as the Sustainable Development Goals.

Expected impacts

Proposals for topics under this Destination should set out a credible pathway to contributing to the following expected impact of the Horizon Europe Strategic Plan:

The full potential of cultural heritage, arts and cultural and creative sectors as a driver of sustainable innovation and a European sense of belonging is realised through a continuous engagement with society, citizens and economic sectors as well as through better protection, restoration and promotion of cultural heritage.

Expected Outcome

Projects should contribute to at least two of the following expected outcomes:

  • Contribute to the objectives of the Green Deal by developing methods to conserve, preserve and restore monuments and artefacts with respect to different materials in a sustainable, green way.
  • Promote research on the quality of conservation, in order to foster a more sustainable and green maintenance and restoration of cultural heritage. Ensure higher quality standards in conservation and restoration of Europe’s cultural heritage.
  • Improve sustainability and energy efficiency in heritage sites, museums and other cultural institutions.
  • Strengthen citizens’ contribution to safeguarding of their cultural heritage and art.

Scope

Materials and methods for the conservation and restoration of cultural heritage can often be energy consuming, not environmentally friendly or even harmful for the health of operators and curators. Moreover, many of these materials and methods prove to be neither durable nor sustainable, often leading to repetitive and costly restoration of artefacts, monuments and heritage sites. Research has already addressed this challenge to a certain extent; yet, the wide range of materials, types of buildings and monuments, and the specific needs of artefacts call for further investigation and tailored solutions.

In this context, and in view of achieving the objectives of the Green Deal, proposals under this topic should provide solutions and explore ways for quality conservation and restoration in a green and sustainable way. They should adopt and apply a holistic approach in conservation of art materials through an interdisciplinary network of knowledge and skills from the perspectives of hard sciences, soft sciences and engineering. Thanks to this, they should develop effective and sustainable strategies that are feasible, user friendly, affordable and safe to the operators and the artefacts, in order to ensure the long-term conservation of and physical access to cultural heritage resources. Monitoring the preservation status of artefacts, monuments and sites with non-intrusive, green tech solutions should also be considered. The proposed materials and methods for remedial or preventive conservation and restoration should be green, durable and sustainable. They should also minimize their environmental footprint21 and impact on health of restorers, curators and craftspeople. Whenever necessary, they should also contribute to energy efficiency and sustainability of monuments, historic buildings and cultural institutions. Elaboration of traditional methods and materials, as well as digital and cutting-edge technologies should be developed or further exploited as necessary.

Taking into account environmental, social and economic impacts, proposals should bring together basic and applied research, social, cultural and entrepreneurial innovation through the involvement of cultural and creative sectors to ensure sustainability. Participation of innovative industry and/or CCIs/SMEs, besides public entities and policy makers, is strongly advised. Awareness raising and further strengthening of citizens’ and young people’s involvement in new or traditional preservation and transmission methods should also be targeted to widen literacy, access to and engagement with cultural heritage.

Eligibility

Eligible non-EU countries:

  • countries associated to Horizon Europe

At the date of the publication of the work programme, there are no countries associated to Horizon Europe. Considering the Union’s interest to retain, in principle, relations with the countries associated to Horizon 2020, most third countries associated to Horizon 2020 are expected to be associated to Horizon Europe with an intention to secure uninterrupted continuity between Horizon 2020 and Horizon Europe. In addition, other third countries can also become associated to Horizon Europe during the programme. For the purposes of the eligibility conditions, applicants established in Horizon 2020 Associated Countries or in other third countries negotiating association to Horizon Europe will be treated as entities established in an Associated Country, if the Horizon Europe association agreement with the third country concerned applies at the time of signature of the grant agreement.

  • low-and middle-income countries

Legal entities which are established in countries not listed above will be eligible for funding if provided for in the specific call conditions, or if their participation is considered essential for implementing the action by the granting authority.

Specific cases:

  • Affiliated entities - Affiliated entities are eligible for funding if they are established in one of the countries listed above.
  • EU bodies - Legal entities created under EU law may also be eligible to receive funding, unless their basic act states otherwise.
  • International organisations - International European research organisations are eligible to receive funding. Unless their participation is considered essential for implementing the action by the granting authority, other international organisations are not eligible to receive funding. International organisations with headquarters in a Member State or Associated Country are eligible to receive funding for ‘Training and mobility’actions and when provided for in the specific call conditions.

Project Partners

Unless otherwise provided for in the specific call conditions, legal entities forming a consortium are eligible to participate in actions provided that the consortium includes:

  • at least one independent legal entity established in a Member State;and
  • at least two other independent legal entities, each established in different Member States or Associated Countries.

Budget

Expected EU contribution per project

The Commission estimates that an EU contribution of between EUR 3.50 and 4.00 million would allow these outcomes to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of a proposal requesting different amounts.

Indicative budget

The total indicative budget for the topic is EUR 12.00 million.

Funding rate

100%

Application Details

See full details in the official call document.

All proposals must be submitted directly online via the Funding & Tenders Portal Electronic Submission System.




Horizon Europe: Cluster 2 - Cultural and creative industries as a driver of innovation and competitiveness Green technologies and materials for cultural heritage


Horizon Europe is the EU’s key funding programme for research and innovation.

This call aims to explore the innovation potential of the cultural and creative industries, their role as drivers of innovation in other sectors and the potential for strengthening competitiveness.

Deadline: 07 October 2021, 17:00 Brussels time

Application Link Overview Cluster 2, ‘Culture, Creativity and Inclusive Society’ aims to meet EU goals and priorities on enhancing democratic governance and citizens participation, on the safeguarding and promotion of cultural heritage, and to respond to and shape multifaceted social, economic, technological and cultural transformations. Cluster 2 mobilises multidisciplinary expertise of European social sciences and humanities for understanding fundamental contemporary transformations of society, economy, politics and culture. It aims to provide evidence-based policy options for a socially just and inclusive European green and digital transition and recovery. Activities contributing to the destination "Innovative Research on the European Cultural Heritage and the Cultural and Creative Industries", will promote better access and engagement with cultural heritage and improve its protection, enhancement and restoration. Research and innovation will support sustainable growth and job creation through the cultural and creative industries and contribute to integrate them into the European industrial policy as drivers for innovation and competitiveness. Background

Europe’s rich cultural heritage, with its common values, its wealth of monuments and sites and its creative diversity of traditions, crafts, arts, architecture, literature, languages, theatre, films and music, not only reflects our past but also shapes our present and builds our future. It is a creative way of cultivating independent thinking and dialogue, while promoting our interests across the world. Access to experience with cultural heritage contributes to social cohesion and inclusion, by strengthening resilience and the sense of belonging, bringing people together and improving well-being.

Europe’s common research and innovation (R&I) action to protect, conserve, restore and repair its important cultural heritage, promote its use as one of the substantial European resources, boost its traditional and contemporary arts and create wider awareness is still limited in scope and impact. Moreover, European tangible and intangible cultural heritage is increasingly facing a number of challenges such as deterioration due to climate change, pollution, natural or man-made disasters, looting and illicit trafficking, lack of finance or insufficient valorisation. In addition, Europe’s cultural production (in particular film and music) lags behind in international competitiveness despite its high quality and quantity.

European R&I activities will make a strong contribution in all these areas by strengthening our common knowledge and expertise, as well as by providing solid evidence for policy-making. They will promote and valorise our cultural heritage and arts, while increasing their international competitiveness and firming the social fabric at European, national, regional or local level. Through a broad co-operation of a wide set of stakeholders and efficient coordination between EU Member States, R&I activities will be oriented towards interdisciplinary research and actively involve the cultural and creative industries (CCIs).

They will connect cultural heritage with the CCIs by supporting new forms of cultural and artistic expression that build on existing cultural assets and provide access to both tangible and intangible heritage. R&I will also promote the competitiveness of cultural and creative industries. It will provide evidence about their role as innovation drivers in the wider economy. In line with the Commission priorities, the R&I activities of this Destination will help promote the European way of life, contribute to achieving the Green Deal goals and support an economy that works for people. They will also contribute to the New European Bauhaus initiative, to realising the UN Sustainable Development Goals and to building a stronger crisis-resilient society and economy by taking into account experiences, challenges and lessons learnt also from the COVID-19 pandemic.

Concretely, R&I activities under this Destination and its calls will support these policy objectives by monitoring, safeguarding and transmitting cultural heritage, fostering the CCIs and promoting cultural diversity. They will aim at protecting historical sites and monuments, artefacts, heritage sites, cultural landscapes, museums and other cultural institutions, languages, customs, traditions and values. Through new or existing cutting-edge conservation and restoration technologies and methods, they will help restore and preserve monuments and artefacts in a green way. They will advance the protection of cultural heritage from natural hazards and anthropogenic threats, including the looting and illicit trafficking of cultural goods. Research and innovation across the cultural and creative sectors will foster their inbuilt innovation potential and will promote transformation in many parts of the economy and social development across Europe. Through new approaches, R&I will offer innovative, integrated, sustainable and participative management and business models for museums and other cultural institutions, with a view to spur inclusive growth, jobs, social cohesion and diversity. It will also contribute to develop a sustainable and quality-driven intervention on built environment in line with the New European Bauhaus initiative. Research in old and new forms of cultural and artistic expression will promote intercultural cooperation, while engaging citizens and young people. It will valorise traditional skills and the reuse of existing assets. Exploring the economic role of CCIs and investigating the impact of creative and artistic intervention into innovation processes will provide capacities to boost Europe’s competitiveness. European cultural heritage, arts and creativity can be harnessed to further develop the design and identity of products, and to shape the public image of our countries and regions. Cultural and intellectual experiences can be marketed at a premium: CCIs are at the frontline of this action, by investing in knowledge and creativity. Furthermore, the use of existing and the development of new digital methodologies will offer innovative approaches to share and increase access to and engagement with cultural heritage. Altogether, these actions will enable real cooperation and participation of a wide range of communities, including stakeholders, citizens and industry.

Through all these activities, research and innovation will underpin the European Union’s leading role in protecting, preserving and enhancing Europe’s cultural heritage and scale-up the competitiveness of its cultural and creative industries.

Proposals under this destination should consider and promote in a cross-cutting way, and whenever appropriate and applicable:

  • The use of digital and cutting-edge technologies;
  • An active and sustainable engagement with stakeholders, social innovators and citizens;
  • The active involvement of local, regional or national authorities and sectoral social partners, particularly in the uptake and implementation of research results and recommendations;
  • A clear strategy for the uptake of research outcomes, recommendations or results, in particular where CCIs are participating or are concerned;
  • Training and education activities for targeted groups of users and/or stakeholders;
  • A robust plan for how projects will use or build on outputs and results from research already undertaken and technology already available;
  • Increased participation of CCIs, SMEs and industry;
  • Lessons learnt from the COVID-19 crisis in view of a sustainable management of the post-crisis society;
  • Contribution to the European Green Deal, the New European Bauhaus as well as the Sustainable Development Goals.

Expected impacts

Proposals for topics under this Destination should set out a credible pathway to contributing to the following expected impact of the Horizon Europe Strategic Plan:

The full potential of cultural heritage, arts and cultural and creative sectors as a driver of sustainable innovation and a European sense of belonging is realised through a continuous engagement with society, citizens and economic sectors as well as through better protection, restoration and promotion of cultural heritage.

Expected outcomes

Projects should contribute to at least two of the following expected outcomes:

  • Evidence of the innovation potential of the cultural and creative industries based in the EU.
  • Evidence of the role of the cultural and creative industries as drivers of innovation in other economic sectors such as industry and services.
  • Evidence of direct and indirect effects on the EU economy by the cultural and creative industries, economic spill-over effects on other sectors and the potential for further economic growth and employment in the cultural and creative industries.
  • Evidence of how cultural and creative EU industries could benefit from new technologies, new business models, skills development, new distribution and/or promotion models.
  • Proposals for further strengthening the competitiveness and drawing benefit from the innovation potential of the sector in the EU and in the international markets.

Scope

The cultural and creative industries (CCI) are an important source of growth and job creation in the European economy. The growth of this sector has raised interest at policy level for its innovation potential and for contributing to improved competitiveness. The challenge is to understand how to realise the full potential of CCIs as a driver for innovation, create stronger links with other sectors and contribute to strengthening the European economy, society and its sustainability.

The cultural and creative industries are as diverse as our cultures. Building on our cultural heritage and using their creativity, they pursue a wide variety of activities, ranging from cultural performances to creative design of products and shaping the public image of countries and regions. The CCI sector counts many self-employed, as well as some very large market players for example in the audio-visual and music sectors. Markets in this sector are heterogeneous and there is no comprehensive mapping at EU level. The CCI sector has been growing rapidly and, in some regions of Europe, it is outperforming more established sectors in terms of growth and employment.

The cultural and creative industries have been heavily affected by the COVID-19 pandemic crisis. The social confinement is likely to have a long-term impact by significantly reducing incomes and adding to unemployment. These problems will need to be taken into consideration in research, including proposals for reinvigorating the sector.

Research proposals should explore the innovation potential of the cultural and creative industries, their role as drivers of innovation in other sectors and the potential for strengthening competitiveness. This could involve strengthening links between science and art. The research should involve the CCIs and other creative actors themselves, policy makers and other stakeholders in order to ensure that the activities are relevant to the end users. Research should study how cultural and creative EU industries could benefit from new technologies, new business models, skills development, new distribution and/or promotion models with the purpose of strengthening their performance. Research should also identify policy measures for further strengthening the competitiveness and drawing benefit from the innovation potential of the sector in the EU and the international markets.

Eligibility

Eligible non-EU countries:

  • countries associated to Horizon Europe

At the date of the publication of the work programme, there are no countries associated to Horizon Europe. Considering the Union’s interest to retain, in principle, relations with the countries associated to Horizon 2020, most third countries associated to Horizon 2020 are expected to be associated to Horizon Europe with an intention to secure uninterrupted continuity between Horizon 2020 and Horizon Europe. In addition, other third countries can also become associated to Horizon Europe during the programme. For the purposes of the eligibility conditions, applicants established in Horizon 2020 Associated Countries or in other third countries negotiating association to Horizon Europe will be treated as entities established in an Associated Country, if the Horizon Europe association agreement with the third country concerned applies at the time of signature of the grant agreement.

  • low-and middle-income countries

Legal entities which are established in countries not listed above will be eligible for funding if provided for in the specific call conditions, or if their participation is considered essential for implementing the action by the granting authority.

Specific cases:

  • Affiliated entities - Affiliated entities are eligible for funding if they are established in one of the countries listed above.
  • EU bodies - Legal entities created under EU law may also be eligible to receive funding, unless their basic act states otherwise.
  • International organisations - International European research organisations are eligible to receive funding. Unless their participation is considered essential for implementing the action by the granting authority, other international organisations are not eligible to receive funding. International organisations with headquarters in a Member State or Associated Country are eligible to receive funding for ‘Training and mobility’actions and when provided for in the specific call conditions.

Project Partners

Unless otherwise provided for in the specific call conditions, legal entities forming a consortium are eligible to participate in actions provided that the consortium includes:

  • at least one independent legal entity established in a Member State;and
  • at least two other independent legal entities, each established in different Member States or Associated Countries.

Budget

Expected EU contribution per project

The Commission estimates that an EU contribution of between EUR 3.50 and 4.00 million would allow these outcomes to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of a proposal requesting different amounts.

Indicative budget

The total indicative budget for the topic is EUR 12.00 million.

Funding rate

100%

Application Details

See full details in the official call document.

All proposals must be submitted directly online via the Funding & Tenders Portal Electronic Submission System.




Horizon Europe: Cluster 2 - Preserving and enhancing cultural heritage with advanced digital technologies


Horizon Europe is the EU’s key funding programme for research and innovation.

This call aims to promote extended digitisation so that collections, artefacts and monuments, including the “born digital” heritage, can be preserved, restored and safeguarded in a sustainable and user-friendly way.

Deadline: 07 October 2021, 17:00 Brussels time


Application Link

Overview Cluster 2, ‘Culture, Creativity and Inclusive Society’ aims to meet EU goals and priorities on enhancing democratic governance and citizens participation, on the safeguarding and promotion of cultural heritage, and to respond to and shape multifaceted social, economic, technological and cultural transformations. Cluster 2 mobilises multidisciplinary expertise of European social sciences and humanities for understanding fundamental contemporary transformations of society, economy, politics and culture. It aims to provide evidence-based policy options for a socially just and inclusive European green and digital transition and recovery. Activities contributing to the destination "Innovative Research on the European Cultural Heritage and the Cultural and Creative Industries", will promote better access and engagement with cultural heritage and improve its protection, enhancement and restoration. Research and innovation will support sustainable growth and job creation through the cultural and creative industries and contribute to integrate them into the European industrial policy as drivers for innovation and competitiveness. Background

Europe’s rich cultural heritage, with its common values, its wealth of monuments and sites and its creative diversity of traditions, crafts, arts, architecture, literature, languages, theatre, films and music, not only reflects our past but also shapes our present and builds our future. It is a creative way of cultivating independent thinking and dialogue, while promoting our interests across the world. Access to experience with cultural heritage contributes to social cohesion and inclusion, by strengthening resilience and the sense of belonging, bringing people together and improving well-being.

Europe’s common research and innovation (R&I) action to protect, conserve, restore and repair its important cultural heritage, promote its use as one of the substantial European resources, boost its traditional and contemporary arts and create wider awareness is still limited in scope and impact. Moreover, European tangible and intangible cultural heritage is increasingly facing a number of challenges such as deterioration due to climate change, pollution, natural or man-made disasters, looting and illicit trafficking, lack of finance or insufficient valorisation. In addition, Europe’s cultural production (in particular film and music) lags behind in international competitiveness despite its high quality and quantity.

European R&I activities will make a strong contribution in all these areas by strengthening our common knowledge and expertise, as well as by providing solid evidence for policy-making. They will promote and valorise our cultural heritage and arts, while increasing their international competitiveness and firming the social fabric at European, national, regional or local level. Through a broad co-operation of a wide set of stakeholders and efficient coordination between EU Member States, R&I activities will be oriented towards interdisciplinary research and actively involve the cultural and creative industries (CCIs).

They will connect cultural heritage with the CCIs by supporting new forms of cultural and artistic expression that build on existing cultural assets and provide access to both tangible and intangible heritage. R&I will also promote the competitiveness of cultural and creative industries. It will provide evidence about their role as innovation drivers in the wider economy. In line with the Commission priorities, the R&I activities of this Destination will help promote the European way of life, contribute to achieving the Green Deal goals and support an economy that works for people. They will also contribute to the New European Bauhaus initiative, to realising the UN Sustainable Development Goals and to building a stronger crisis-resilient society and economy by taking into account experiences, challenges and lessons learnt also from the COVID-19 pandemic.

Concretely, R&I activities under this Destination and its calls will support these policy objectives by monitoring, safeguarding and transmitting cultural heritage, fostering the CCIs and promoting cultural diversity. They will aim at protecting historical sites and monuments, artefacts, heritage sites, cultural landscapes, museums and other cultural institutions, languages, customs, traditions and values. Through new or existing cutting-edge conservation and restoration technologies and methods, they will help restore and preserve monuments and artefacts in a green way. They will advance the protection of cultural heritage from natural hazards and anthropogenic threats, including the looting and illicit trafficking of cultural goods. Research and innovation across the cultural and creative sectors will foster their inbuilt innovation potential and will promote transformation in many parts of the economy and social development across Europe. Through new approaches, R&I will offer innovative, integrated, sustainable and participative management and business models for museums and other cultural institutions, with a view to spur inclusive growth, jobs, social cohesion and diversity. It will also contribute to develop a sustainable and quality-driven intervention on built environment in line with the New European Bauhaus initiative. Research in old and new forms of cultural and artistic expression will promote intercultural cooperation, while engaging citizens and young people. It will valorise traditional skills and the reuse of existing assets. Exploring the economic role of CCIs and investigating the impact of creative and artistic intervention into innovation processes will provide capacities to boost Europe’s competitiveness. European cultural heritage, arts and creativity can be harnessed to further develop the design and identity of products, and to shape the public image of our countries and regions. Cultural and intellectual experiences can be marketed at a premium: CCIs are at the frontline of this action, by investing in knowledge and creativity. Furthermore, the use of existing and the development of new digital methodologies will offer innovative approaches to share and increase access to and engagement with cultural heritage. Altogether, these actions will enable real cooperation and participation of a wide range of communities, including stakeholders, citizens and industry.

Through all these activities, research and innovation will underpin the European Union’s leading role in protecting, preserving and enhancing Europe’s cultural heritage and scale-up the competitiveness of its cultural and creative industries.

Proposals under this destination should consider and promote in a cross-cutting way, and whenever appropriate and applicable:

  • The use of digital and cutting-edge technologies;
  • An active and sustainable engagement with stakeholders, social innovators and citizens;
  • The active involvement of local, regional or national authorities and sectoral social partners, particularly in the uptake and implementation of research results and recommendations;
  • A clear strategy for the uptake of research outcomes, recommendations or results, in particular where CCIs are participating or are concerned;
  • Training and education activities for targeted groups of users and/or stakeholders;
  • A robust plan for how projects will use or build on outputs and results from research already undertaken and technology already available;
  • Increased participation of CCIs, SMEs and industry;
  • Lessons learnt from the COVID-19 crisis in view of a sustainable management of the post-crisis society;
  • Contribution to the European Green Deal, the New European Bauhaus as well as the Sustainable Development Goals.

Expected impacts

Proposals for topics under this Destination should set out a credible pathway to contributing to the following expected impact of the Horizon Europe Strategic Plan:

The full potential of cultural heritage, arts and cultural and creative sectors as a driver of sustainable innovation and a European sense of belonging is realised through a continuous engagement with society, citizens and economic sectors as well as through better protection, restoration and promotion of cultural heritage.

Expected Outcome

Projects should contribute to at least two of the following expected outcomes:

  • Develop and strengthen the use of digital technologies to protect, preserve, restore and safeguard cultural heritage and the arts in complementarity to other research methods.
  • Facilitate and widen access to cultural assets through digital and cutting-edge technologies and tools, in parallel or as an alternative to physical access to cultural heritage.
  • Support comparative analysis with artificial intelligence, including analysis across time, and other digital means to improve innovation and knowledge exchange in the cultural and creative sectors.
  • Increase the competitiveness of cultural and creative industries in the internal market and internationally, and provide opportunities for new and sustainable jobs creation.
  • Explore the role of digital tools, such as 3D/4D simulations, virtual and augmented reality technologies in engaging with cultural heritage during and after the COVID-19 crisis.
  • Use digital tools and other outcomes to provide efficient and global solutions to the real needs of accessing, protecting and preserving cultural heritage, including the “born digital” one.

Scope

Digital technologies, from 3D simulation to artificial intelligence and virtual/augmented reality, are being used to ensure preservation and wide access to cultural heritage and the arts. Extensive research has been already funded to support the digitisation of libraries and archives, virtual tours of museums and archaeological sites, as well as digital curation and preservation of cultural goods. However, there is need to expand and further support the application of digital tools to preserve cultural heritage and to make it widely accessible. The relation between cultural heritage and its digitised format through the experience of audiences is of particular interest. Moreover, the “born digital” heritage, in parallel to the digitised one, is becoming of increased importance, requiring further research on its intrinsic value and limitations of use.

The role played by digital during the recent COVID-19 pandemic crisis is especially noteworthy, as it proved to be the most valuable means to access cultural assets during the extended period of confinement. Museums and libraries offered free access to their collections, artists were performing live online and theatres where streaming their performances through the web to help lift up people’s morale and improve their well-being. Assessing the impact of these activities and drawing lessons in view of future crisis management requires targeted research.

Taking these points into account, R&I actions under this topic are envisaged to promote extended digitisation so that collections, artefacts and monuments, including the “born digital” heritage, can be preserved, restored and safeguarded in a sustainable and user-friendly way. At the same time, research should prevent any potential negative consequence of doing so. In addition, digitisation practices have to comply with intellectual property law, in particular copyright law. They should develop digital facilities that will allow building shared infrastructures, provide specialised trainings and courses and facilitate knowledge and know-how exchange to address real needs in the field of cultural heritage. Projects should thus increase the use of existing tools and cutting-edge technologies, such as virtual and augmented reality or artificial intelligence, to reduce access and knowledge limitations to cultural assets. By assessing the role of digitisation in engaging with culture and cultural heritage during the COVID-19 crisis, they should draw lessons and provide resilient policy scenarios or recovery tools for the cultural and creative sectors in a post-crisis era. By creating new or fostering existing tools, they should aim at boosting the socio-economic sustainability of cultural and creative industries in the COVID-19 post-crisis period and provide sustainable applications and solutions to strengthen their innovation potential as well as manage future crises. This requires collaboration between technological firms, research institutes, universities and cultural and creative sectors/industries to generate tailor made know-how and transfer expertise to foster the digital transformation of Cultural Heritage institutions. Innovative approaches to R&I including user-led innovation could be applicable.

R&I actions funded under this topic are expected to establish the state of the art of digital methodologies and tools to protect the rich and diverse European cultural heritage, including the “born digital” heritage, in complementarity with more established conservation and protection methods. Data and products coming from the Copernicus services, specifically Copernicus Emergency, Copernicus Atmosphere Monitoring, Climate Change and Copernicus Land Monitoring Services can give a great support in preserving cultural and natural heritage sites.

Eligibility

Eligible non-EU countries:

  • countries associated to Horizon Europe

At the date of the publication of the work programme, there are no countries associated to Horizon Europe. Considering the Union’s interest to retain, in principle, relations with the countries associated to Horizon 2020, most third countries associated to Horizon 2020 are expected to be associated to Horizon Europe with an intention to secure uninterrupted continuity between Horizon 2020 and Horizon Europe. In addition, other third countries can also become associated to Horizon Europe during the programme. For the purposes of the eligibility conditions, applicants established in Horizon 2020 Associated Countries or in other third countries negotiating association to Horizon Europe will be treated as entities established in an Associated Country, if the Horizon Europe association agreement with the third country concerned applies at the time of signature of the grant agreement.

  • low-and middle-income countries

Legal entities which are established in countries not listed above will be eligible for funding if provided for in the specific call conditions, or if their participation is considered essential for implementing the action by the granting authority.

Specific cases:

  • Affiliated entities - Affiliated entities are eligible for funding if they are established in one of the countries listed above.
  • EU bodies - Legal entities created under EU law may also be eligible to receive funding, unless their basic act states otherwise.
  • International organisations - International European research organisations are eligible to receive funding. Unless their participation is considered essential for implementing the action by the granting authority, other international organisations are not eligible to receive funding. International organisations with headquarters in a Member State or Associated Country are eligible to receive funding for ‘Training and mobility’actions and when provided for in the specific call conditions.

Project Partners

Unless otherwise provided for in the specific call conditions, legal entities forming a consortium are eligible to participate in actions provided that the consortium includes:

  • at least one independent legal entity established in a Member State;and
  • at least two other independent legal entities, each established in different Member States or Associated Countries.

Budget

Expected EU contribution per project

The Commission estimates that an EU contribution of between EUR 3.50 and 4.00 million would allow these outcomes to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of a proposal requesting different amounts.

Indicative budget

The total indicative budget for the topic is EUR 12.00 million.

Funding rate

100%

Application Details

See full details in the official call document.

All proposals must be submitted directly online via the Funding & Tenders Portal Electronic Submission System.




Horizon Europe: Cluster 2 - Providing support in a changing world of work and social protection


Horizon Europe is the EU’s key funding programme for research and innovation.

This call aims to better understand the labour market impacts of the arising new forms of work on the European welfare systems.

Deadline: 07 October 2021, 17:00 Brussels time

Application Link

Overview Cluster 2, ‘Culture, Creativity and Inclusive Society’ aims to meet EU goals and priorities on enhancing democratic governance and citizens participation, on the safeguarding and promotion of cultural heritage, and to respond to and shape multifaceted social, economic, technological and cultural transformations. Cluster 2 mobilises multidisciplinary expertise of European social sciences and humanities for understanding fundamental contemporary transformations of society, economy, politics and culture. It aims to provide evidence-based policy options for a socially just and inclusive European green and digital transition and recovery.

Activities contributing to the destination "Innovative Research on Social and Economic Transformations" will help tackle social, economic and political inequalities, support human capital development and contribute to a comprehensive European strategy for inclusive growth. This also involves understanding and responding to the impacts of technological advancements and economic interconnectedness with a view to social resilience.

Background

Europe is being transformed by changes that impact the livelihoods and wellbeing of its citizens. Such changes present important opportunities for the EU to innovate and shape forward looking inclusive societies and economies, while avoiding the mistakes of the past and promoting an inclusive recovery that strengthens economic and social resilience. However, demographic changes, digitalisation, automation, environmental degradation, the transition to a low carbon economy and globalisation all pose multidimensional, interconnected and complex social and economic challenges. At the same time, there has been an increase in inequality, poverty and social exclusion, a polarisation of skill needs in the labour market, and a slowdown in convergence in income and employment in most European countries. Inequalities threaten social and territorial cohesion, economic growth and wellbeing. Moreover, the COVID-19 pandemic has magnified the pervasive inequalities across European societies, with significant differences in the way losses and costs of the COVID-19 pandemic and the crisis that followed are distributed in society. To seize the opportunities emerging from socio-economic transformations in a strongly connected and integrated world, these challenges need to be better understood and tackled.

Population ageing increases social protection spending on pensions, health and long-term care and restricts the capacity of the redistributive system to reduce inequality. Societies also need to adapt to a new role elderly people may have, with their experience and capacity to remain productive. Policies need to support a transition towards more environmentally-friendly ways of producing and providing private and public services, while ensuring all regions and individuals equally benefit from these transitions and that no one is left behind, in particular when it comes to access to essential services. Access to social protection for those in need should be ensured, while making sure that everyone can participate in economic, social, political and cultural developments. Social protection supports individuals in emergencies that they can no longer cope with on their own and, in addition, protect them by means of long-term measures – whether in the event of illness, accident, need for care, unemployment or old age. Moreover, mitigation and adaptation strategies are essential to make sure population movements shaped by these transitions are positive for all areas, and do not contribute to deepening the divide between regions or countries.

Education and training are key long-term factors in preventing and reversing inequalities and promoting equal opportunities, inclusion and social mobility. However, the educational outcomes of younger generations are still determined to a large extent by the socio-economic background of their parents rather than by their own potential. Promoting and ensuring inclusion and equity in education and training is thus fundamental in breaking these patterns.

In this context, it is important to reflect on the nature of economic growth and the need to better capture the different dimensions of social progress. It is increasingly important to distinguish between the different purposes of measurement: economic activity, social and cultural wellbeing and sustainability, and to develop relevant indicators. This is particularly the case as the pervasive effects of the COVID-19 pandemic has altered the economic performance and socio-economic fabric of many countries in Europe.

Migration has been a critical component of the makeup of European societies, one that is likely to dominate policy and political agendas for many years to come. It is an issue requiring comprehensive and coordinated European responses in order to ripen its benefits, both inside and outside the EU, involving Member States, Associated and partner countries, EU actors, as well as local and regional authorities, civil society organisations, migrants’ representatives – including migrant organisations – and economic and social partners. Partnerships between these stakeholders are needed to make the most of the positive consequences of migration, as well as ensuring that migration occurs in an orderly and dignified manner. The task of research is to better understand migration in a global and EU context, assist in its governance, support security and help the socio-economic as well as civil-political inclusion of migrants in European societies. It can enhance policies by providing evidence on the causes and consequences of the phenomena and facilitate timely response by identifying trends and suggesting possible policy solutions.

The implementation of the research activities in the two calls of this Destination will contribute to a comprehensive and reflective European strategy for inclusive growth, including social, economic, ecological and historical dimensions. This will strengthen the resilience of the EU and of its citizens, and will ensure that no one is left behind, including through the accumulation and preservation of human capital in the face of old and new risks. It will equally support productivity gains and their fair distribution, as well as boosting social and economic resilience that is essential to face situations of crisis such as in the case of COVID-19. Activities will contribute to EU migration and mobility policies, both internal and external. The overall knowledge generated, including a holistic understanding of societal wellbeing, will feed into the design of policy strategies in line with the above mentioned objectives and will facilitate the assessment of policy needs and outcomes in the field of the societal and economic transformations.

The Destination calls for proposals that may help in reaching these key strategic policy objectives in the EU. It invites proposals to do so by integrating feedback loops with stakeholders and policymakers that may help in developing suggestions and recommendations throughout their lifecycles. These proposals should take into consideration the stakeholders associated to the decisions that are suggested, and should also account for the context in which decisions are made. Therefore, in order to maximize and facilitate the uptake of group-sensitive recommendations in policy, they should include analyses of political and financial trade-offs associated to the recommendations produced, reflecting also on contextual changes needed to implement proposals developed. Proposals are also invited to build upon previous research funded by Horizon 2020, valorising its experience and findings.

Expected impacts

Proposals for topics under this Destination should set out a credible pathway to contributing to the following targeted expected impacts of the Horizon Europe Strategic Plan:

  • Social and economic resilience and sustainability are strengthened through a better understanding of the social, ethical, political and economic impacts of drivers of change (such as technology, globalisation, demographics, mobility and migration) and their interplay.

Inclusive growth is boosted and vulnerabilities are reduced effectively through evidence-based policies for protecting and enhancing employment, education, social fairness and tackling inequalities, including in response to the socio-economic challenges due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Expected Outcome

Projects should contribute to all of the following expected outcomes:

  • Better understand the labour market impacts of the arising new forms of work on the European welfare systems, cast against a background of demographic changes, globalisation, digitalisation and a green transition.
  • Propose policy measures for adapting welfare systems to improve their contribution to reducing socio-economic inequalities and poverty, to protecting people from various forms of hardship and to providing the possibility for atypical workers and the self-employed to transition towards more stable work relationships if desired, while acting as an important catalyst for economic prosperity.
  • Draw lessons from recent policy interventions in a contextual manner and propose adjustment measures.

Scope

Welfare states play an integral role in reducing socio-economic inequalities and lifelong consequences of growing up in poverty, as well as in protecting people from various forms of hardship (such as unemployment and ill health) and in providing the possibility for atypical workers and the self-employed to shift towards more stable work relationships, if desired. They are also an important catalyst for economic prosperity. On the medium term however, Europe is expected to face intense demographic changes coupled with a decarbonisation of its economy, globalisation and digitalisation, all of which affect the labour market and related welfare state. At the same time, new forms of work arise, and these risk creating jobs that contribute less to and are less protected by the welfare state.

Innovative research that investigates and provides new understanding about the impact of such changes on the European labour market and related welfare systems is therefore needed, to ensure that welfare systems adapt accordingly and continue to fulfil the above mentioned roles.

Research activities may focus on the interaction between welfare policies and labour market aspects of demographic change (such as ageing, changes in household patterns, evolution of gender roles, etc.). They may alternatively concentrate on the interaction between welfare policies and labour market aspects of globalisation (such as trade liberalisation, immigration, tax competition, etc.), of digitalisation or of the green transition (such as task automation, increased career heterogeneity, job transitioning, work-home balance, need for reskilling, upskilling and lifelong learning, etc.). For example, proposals may consider the impact of an ageing population on public revenues and expenditure, while exploring alternative tax structures, tax bases and revenue sources to be implemented in an increasingly globalised economy. Proposals may otherwise investigate the impact of precariousness, unemployment and increasing job transitions on the psychosocial work environment, on social security systems, economic competitiveness and the overall mental health and wellbeing of concerned individuals, including children and youth. Furthermore, they may explore the ways in which market access and digitalisation should be shaped to enable transitions into decent work and increased socio-economic security and the role of welfare on stimulating entrepreneurship and risk-taking.

Where relevant, activities should build upon existing research, draw lessons from recent policy interventions in a contextual and transdisciplinary manner and propose adjustment measures, or test them through social innovation experiments.

Eligibility

Eligible non-EU countries:

  • countries associated to Horizon Europe

At the date of the publication of the work programme, there are no countries associated to Horizon Europe. Considering the Union’s interest to retain, in principle, relations with the countries associated to Horizon 2020, most third countries associated to Horizon 2020 are expected to be associated to Horizon Europe with an intention to secure uninterrupted continuity between Horizon 2020 and Horizon Europe. In addition, other third countries can also become associated to Horizon Europe during the programme. For the purposes of the eligibility conditions, applicants established in Horizon 2020 Associated Countries or in other third countries negotiating association to Horizon Europe will be treated as entities established in an Associated Country, if the Horizon Europe association agreement with the third country concerned applies at the time of signature of the grant agreement.

  • low-and middle-income countries

Legal entities which are established in countries not listed above will be eligible for funding if provided for in the specific call conditions, or if their participation is considered essential for implementing the action by the granting authority.

Specific cases:

  • Affiliated entities - Affiliated entities are eligible for funding if they are established in one of the countries listed above.
  • EU bodies - Legal entities created under EU law may also be eligible to receive funding, unless their basic act states otherwise.
  • International organisations - International European research organisations are eligible to receive funding. Unless their participation is considered essential for implementing the action by the granting authority, other international organisations are not eligible to receive funding. International organisations with headquarters in a Member State or Associated Country are eligible to receive funding for ‘Training and mobility’actions and when provided for in the specific call conditions.

Project Partners

Unless otherwise provided for in the specific call conditions, legal entities forming a consortium are eligible to participate in actions provided that the consortium includes:

  • at least one independent legal entity established in a Member State;and
  • at least two other independent legal entities, each established in different Member States or Associated Countries.

Budget

Expected EU contribution per project

The Commission estimates that an EU contribution of between EUR 2.00 and 3.00 million would allow these outcomes to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of a proposal requesting different amounts.

Indicative budget

The total indicative budget for the topic is EUR 9.00 million.

Funding rate

100%

Application Details

See full details in the official call document.

All proposals must be submitted directly online via the Funding & Tenders Portal Electronic Submission System.




Horizon Europe: Cluster 2 - Addressing poor learning outcomes in basic skills and early school leaving at national, regional and local level in Europe


Horizon Europe is the EU’s key funding programme for research and innovation.

This call aims to develop a specific diagnosis and targeted methodologies for combatting persistent low levels and negative trends in learning outcomes in Europe, by devising strategies and policy recommendations to improve social inclusion, learning and cognitive skills.

Deadline: 07 October 2021, 17:00 Brussels time

Application Link

Overview Cluster 2, ‘Culture, Creativity and Inclusive Society’ aims to meet EU goals and priorities on enhancing democratic governance and citizens participation, on the safeguarding and promotion of cultural heritage, and to respond to and shape multifaceted social, economic, technological and cultural transformations. Cluster 2 mobilises multidisciplinary expertise of European social sciences and humanities for understanding fundamental contemporary transformations of society, economy, politics and culture. It aims to provide evidence-based policy options for a socially just and inclusive European green and digital transition and recovery.

Activities contributing to the destination "Innovative Research on Social and Economic Transformations" will help tackle social, economic and political inequalities, support human capital development and contribute to a comprehensive European strategy for inclusive growth. This also involves understanding and responding to the impacts of technological advancements and economic interconnectedness with a view to social resilience.

Background

Europe is being transformed by changes that impact the livelihoods and wellbeing of its citizens. Such changes present important opportunities for the EU to innovate and shape forward looking inclusive societies and economies, while avoiding the mistakes of the past and promoting an inclusive recovery that strengthens economic and social resilience. However, demographic changes, digitalisation, automation, environmental degradation, the transition to a low carbon economy and globalisation all pose multidimensional, interconnected and complex social and economic challenges. At the same time, there has been an increase in inequality, poverty and social exclusion, a polarisation of skill needs in the labour market, and a slowdown in convergence in income and employment in most European countries. Inequalities threaten social and territorial cohesion, economic growth and wellbeing. Moreover, the COVID-19 pandemic has magnified the pervasive inequalities across European societies, with significant differences in the way losses and costs of the COVID-19 pandemic and the crisis that followed are distributed in society. To seize the opportunities emerging from socio-economic transformations in a strongly connected and integrated world, these challenges need to be better understood and tackled.

Population ageing increases social protection spending on pensions, health and long-term care and restricts the capacity of the redistributive system to reduce inequality. Societies also need to adapt to a new role elderly people may have, with their experience and capacity to remain productive. Policies need to support a transition towards more environmentally-friendly ways of producing and providing private and public services, while ensuring all regions and individuals equally benefit from these transitions and that no one is left behind, in particular when it comes to access to essential services. Access to social protection for those in need should be ensured, while making sure that everyone can participate in economic, social, political and cultural developments. Social protection supports individuals in emergencies that they can no longer cope with on their own and, in addition, protect them by means of long-term measures – whether in the event of illness, accident, need for care, unemployment or old age. Moreover, mitigation and adaptation strategies are essential to make sure population movements shaped by these transitions are positive for all areas, and do not contribute to deepening the divide between regions or countries.

Education and training are key long-term factors in preventing and reversing inequalities and promoting equal opportunities, inclusion and social mobility. However, the educational outcomes of younger generations are still determined to a large extent by the socio-economic background of their parents rather than by their own potential. Promoting and ensuring inclusion and equity in education and training is thus fundamental in breaking these patterns.

In this context, it is important to reflect on the nature of economic growth and the need to better capture the different dimensions of social progress. It is increasingly important to distinguish between the different purposes of measurement: economic activity, social and cultural wellbeing and sustainability, and to develop relevant indicators. This is particularly the case as the pervasive effects of the COVID-19 pandemic has altered the economic performance and socio-economic fabric of many countries in Europe.

Migration has been a critical component of the makeup of European societies, one that is likely to dominate policy and political agendas for many years to come. It is an issue requiring comprehensive and coordinated European responses in order to ripen its benefits, both inside and outside the EU, involving Member States, Associated and partner countries, EU actors, as well as local and regional authorities, civil society organisations, migrants’ representatives – including migrant organisations – and economic and social partners. Partnerships between these stakeholders are needed to make the most of the positive consequences of migration, as well as ensuring that migration occurs in an orderly and dignified manner. The task of research is to better understand migration in a global and EU context, assist in its governance, support security and help the socio-economic as well as civil-political inclusion of migrants in European societies. It can enhance policies by providing evidence on the causes and consequences of the phenomena and facilitate timely response by identifying trends and suggesting possible policy solutions.

The implementation of the research activities in the two calls of this Destination will contribute to a comprehensive and reflective European strategy for inclusive growth, including social, economic, ecological and historical dimensions. This will strengthen the resilience of the EU and of its citizens, and will ensure that no one is left behind, including through the accumulation and preservation of human capital in the face of old and new risks. It will equally support productivity gains and their fair distribution, as well as boosting social and economic resilience that is essential to face situations of crisis such as in the case of COVID-19. Activities will contribute to EU migration and mobility policies, both internal and external. The overall knowledge generated, including a holistic understanding of societal wellbeing, will feed into the design of policy strategies in line with the above mentioned objectives and will facilitate the assessment of policy needs and outcomes in the field of the societal and economic transformations.

The Destination calls for proposals that may help in reaching these key strategic policy objectives in the EU. It invites proposals to do so by integrating feedback loops with stakeholders and policymakers that may help in developing suggestions and recommendations throughout their lifecycles. These proposals should take into consideration the stakeholders associated to the decisions that are suggested, and should also account for the context in which decisions are made. Therefore, in order to maximize and facilitate the uptake of group-sensitive recommendations in policy, they should include analyses of political and financial trade-offs associated to the recommendations produced, reflecting also on contextual changes needed to implement proposals developed. Proposals are also invited to build upon previous research funded by Horizon 2020, valorising its experience and findings.

Expected impacts

Proposals for topics under this Destination should set out a credible pathway to contributing to the following targeted expected impacts of the Horizon Europe Strategic Plan:

  • Social and economic resilience and sustainability are strengthened through a better understanding of the social, ethical, political and economic impacts of drivers of change (such as technology, globalisation, demographics, mobility and migration) and their interplay.

Inclusive growth is boosted and vulnerabilities are reduced effectively through evidence-based policies for protecting and enhancing employment, education, social fairness and tackling inequalities, including in response to the socio-economic challenges due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Expected Outcome

Projects should contribute to all of the following expected outcomes:

  • Support research and policy action to address low-achievement in basic skills as well as in digital skills, prevent school dropout, thereby increasing social upward mobility in Europe.
  • Examine the quality of learning outcomes for primary and secondary school pupils and their determinants, including the influence of high quality early childhood education and care (ECEC).
  • Analyse and recommend possible policy approaches to address underachievement, evaluate successful and less successful policies and practices based on scientific research and evidence, as well as mobilise stakeholders to design innovative policy solutions, which can be scalable and replicable by other projects and stakeholders.
  • Understand, explain and tackle better the challenge of underachievement in relation to school dropout mentioned above, i.e. in the context of early tracking policies, while focusing in particular on students belonging to vulnerable populations most affected by dropout (socio-economically disadvantaged groups, Roma, migrants, refugees, etc.).
  • Explore good practices in school guidance, orientation and tutorial actions in current educational contexts, addressing low-achievement in basic skills as well as tackling early school leaving, in order to support educational stakeholders and foster school inclusiveness.

Scope

Proposals should concentrate on the institutional, socio-economic, cognitive, cultural, linguistic gender, psycho-emotional and well-being determinants, as well as the root causes of underachievement and school dropout at primary, secondary and post-secondary levels of education. They should adopt a general life-long learning (LLL) approach, in which the development of the key competence of learning to learn is crucial.

Proposals should take into account inequalities and the educational actions to overcome them. In addition, the action should examine the causes of underachievement related with the availability and quality of early childhood education and care (ECEC). This should enable the formulation of novel policy measures and targeted actions aimed at reducing the compounded impact of underachievement and school dropout on socio-economic fairness and inter-generational mobility in Europe. The action could also consider experimental research in order to better test the tools, the methods and the organisation of education by involving social and civil society actors, as well as relevant stakeholders.

The proposals should develop a specific diagnosis and targeted methodologies for combatting persistent low levels and negative trends in learning outcomes in Europe, by devising strategies and policy recommendations to improve social inclusion, learning and cognitive skills. The action should focus on student proficiency in reading, mathematics and science, while also taking into account the importance of supporting and reinforcing the development of other key competences and basic skills. It should look equally at the effects of tracking between different educational pathways and the impact on different target groups, especially vulnerable and marginalised communities. The action should provide a comparative assessment of existing policies targeting the achievement gap. Proposals should focus especially on the socio-economic background of multi-disadvantaged learners and their educational outcomes, as well as on the issue of persons not in education, employment or training (NEETs). Finally, they should involve relevant educational stakeholders with a double goal of allowing co-creation and enhancing societal impact in the future.

Eligibility

Eligible non-EU countries:

  • countries associated to Horizon Europe

At the date of the publication of the work programme, there are no countries associated to Horizon Europe. Considering the Union’s interest to retain, in principle, relations with the countries associated to Horizon 2020, most third countries associated to Horizon 2020 are expected to be associated to Horizon Europe with an intention to secure uninterrupted continuity between Horizon 2020 and Horizon Europe. In addition, other third countries can also become associated to Horizon Europe during the programme. For the purposes of the eligibility conditions, applicants established in Horizon 2020 Associated Countries or in other third countries negotiating association to Horizon Europe will be treated as entities established in an Associated Country, if the Horizon Europe association agreement with the third country concerned applies at the time of signature of the grant agreement.

  • low-and middle-income countries

Legal entities which are established in countries not listed above will be eligible for funding if provided for in the specific call conditions, or if their participation is considered essential for implementing the action by the granting authority.

Specific cases:

  • Affiliated entities - Affiliated entities are eligible for funding if they are established in one of the countries listed above.
  • EU bodies - Legal entities created under EU law may also be eligible to receive funding, unless their basic act states otherwise.
  • International organisations - International European research organisations are eligible to receive funding. Unless their participation is considered essential for implementing the action by the granting authority, other international organisations are not eligible to receive funding. International organisations with headquarters in a Member State or Associated Country are eligible to receive funding for ‘Training and mobility’actions and when provided for in the specific call conditions.

Project Partners

Unless otherwise provided for in the specific call conditions, legal entities forming a consortium are eligible to participate in actions provided that the consortium includes:

  • at least one independent legal entity established in a Member State;and
  • at least two other independent legal entities, each established in different Member States or Associated Countries.

Budget

Expected EU contribution per project

The Commission estimates that an EU contribution of between EUR 2.00 and 3.00 million would allow these outcomes to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of a proposal requesting different amounts.

Indicative budget

The total indicative budget for the topic is EUR 9.00 million.

Funding rate

100%

Application Details

See full details in the official call document.

All proposals must be submitted directly online via the Funding & Tenders Portal Electronic Submission System.




Horizon Europe: Cluster 2 - Integration of emerging new technologies into education and training


Horizon Europe is the EU’s key funding programme for research and innovation.

This call aims to develop a specific diagnosis and targeted methodologies for combatting persistent low levels and negative trends in learning outcomes in Europe, by devising strategies and policy recommendations to improve social inclusion, learning and cognitive skills.

Deadline: 07 October 2021, 17:00 Brussels time


Application Link

Overview Cluster 2, ‘Culture, Creativity and Inclusive Society’ aims to meet EU goals and priorities on enhancing democratic governance and citizens participation, on the safeguarding and promotion of cultural heritage, and to respond to and shape multifaceted social, economic, technological and cultural transformations. Cluster 2 mobilises multidisciplinary expertise of European social sciences and humanities for understanding fundamental contemporary transformations of society, economy, politics and culture. It aims to provide evidence-based policy options for a socially just and inclusive European green and digital transition and recovery.

Activities contributing to the destination "Innovative Research on Social and Economic Transformations" will help tackle social, economic and political inequalities, support human capital development and contribute to a comprehensive European strategy for inclusive growth. This also involves understanding and responding to the impacts of technological advancements and economic interconnectedness with a view to social resilience.

Background

Europe is being transformed by changes that impact the livelihoods and wellbeing of its citizens. Such changes present important opportunities for the EU to innovate and shape forward looking inclusive societies and economies, while avoiding the mistakes of the past and promoting an inclusive recovery that strengthens economic and social resilience. However, demographic changes, digitalisation, automation, environmental degradation, the transition to a low carbon economy and globalisation all pose multidimensional, interconnected and complex social and economic challenges. At the same time, there has been an increase in inequality, poverty and social exclusion, a polarisation of skill needs in the labour market, and a slowdown in convergence in income and employment in most European countries. Inequalities threaten social and territorial cohesion, economic growth and wellbeing. Moreover, the COVID-19 pandemic has magnified the pervasive inequalities across European societies, with significant differences in the way losses and costs of the COVID-19 pandemic and the crisis that followed are distributed in society. To seize the opportunities emerging from socio-economic transformations in a strongly connected and integrated world, these challenges need to be better understood and tackled.

Population ageing increases social protection spending on pensions, health and long-term care and restricts the capacity of the redistributive system to reduce inequality. Societies also need to adapt to a new role elderly people may have, with their experience and capacity to remain productive. Policies need to support a transition towards more environmentally-friendly ways of producing and providing private and public services, while ensuring all regions and individuals equally benefit from these transitions and that no one is left behind, in particular when it comes to access to essential services. Access to social protection for those in need should be ensured, while making sure that everyone can participate in economic, social, political and cultural developments. Social protection supports individuals in emergencies that they can no longer cope with on their own and, in addition, protect them by means of long-term measures – whether in the event of illness, accident, need for care, unemployment or old age. Moreover, mitigation and adaptation strategies are essential to make sure population movements shaped by these transitions are positive for all areas, and do not contribute to deepening the divide between regions or countries.

Education and training are key long-term factors in preventing and reversing inequalities and promoting equal opportunities, inclusion and social mobility. However, the educational outcomes of younger generations are still determined to a large extent by the socio-economic background of their parents rather than by their own potential. Promoting and ensuring inclusion and equity in education and training is thus fundamental in breaking these patterns.

In this context, it is important to reflect on the nature of economic growth and the need to better capture the different dimensions of social progress. It is increasingly important to distinguish between the different purposes of measurement: economic activity, social and cultural wellbeing and sustainability, and to develop relevant indicators. This is particularly the case as the pervasive effects of the COVID-19 pandemic has altered the economic performance and socio-economic fabric of many countries in Europe.

Migration has been a critical component of the makeup of European societies, one that is likely to dominate policy and political agendas for many years to come. It is an issue requiring comprehensive and coordinated European responses in order to ripen its benefits, both inside and outside the EU, involving Member States, Associated and partner countries, EU actors, as well as local and regional authorities, civil society organisations, migrants’ representatives – including migrant organisations – and economic and social partners. Partnerships between these stakeholders are needed to make the most of the positive consequences of migration, as well as ensuring that migration occurs in an orderly and dignified manner. The task of research is to better understand migration in a global and EU context, assist in its governance, support security and help the socio-economic as well as civil-political inclusion of migrants in European societies. It can enhance policies by providing evidence on the causes and consequences of the phenomena and facilitate timely response by identifying trends and suggesting possible policy solutions.

The implementation of the research activities in the two calls of this Destination will contribute to a comprehensive and reflective European strategy for inclusive growth, including social, economic, ecological and historical dimensions. This will strengthen the resilience of the EU and of its citizens, and will ensure that no one is left behind, including through the accumulation and preservation of human capital in the face of old and new risks. It will equally support productivity gains and their fair distribution, as well as boosting social and economic resilience that is essential to face situations of crisis such as in the case of COVID-19. Activities will contribute to EU migration and mobility policies, both internal and external. The overall knowledge generated, including a holistic understanding of societal wellbeing, will feed into the design of policy strategies in line with the above mentioned objectives and will facilitate the assessment of policy needs and outcomes in the field of the societal and economic transformations.

The Destination calls for proposals that may help in reaching these key strategic policy objectives in the EU. It invites proposals to do so by integrating feedback loops with stakeholders and policymakers that may help in developing suggestions and recommendations throughout their lifecycles. These proposals should take into consideration the stakeholders associated to the decisions that are suggested, and should also account for the context in which decisions are made. Therefore, in order to maximize and facilitate the uptake of group-sensitive recommendations in policy, they should include analyses of political and financial trade-offs associated to the recommendations produced, reflecting also on contextual changes needed to implement proposals developed. Proposals are also invited to build upon previous research funded by Horizon 2020, valorising its experience and findings.

Expected impacts

Proposals for topics under this Destination should set out a credible pathway to contributing to the following targeted expected impacts of the Horizon Europe Strategic Plan:

  • Social and economic resilience and sustainability are strengthened through a better understanding of the social, ethical, political and economic impacts of drivers of change (such as technology, globalisation, demographics, mobility and migration) and their interplay.

Inclusive growth is boosted and vulnerabilities are reduced effectively through evidence-based policies for protecting and enhancing employment, education, social fairness and tackling inequalities, including in response to the socio-economic challenges due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Expected Outcome

Projects should contribute to all of the following expected outcomes:

  • Increase the shared critical understanding of the potential, opportunities, barriers, accessibility issues and risks of using emerging technologies for teaching and learning, as well considering the framework for the sustainable digitisation of education and learning in the future.
  • Support education and training systems with research on the adaptation and mainstreaming of the use of digitally enhanced pedagogies, in order to augment and extend learning, while also maintaining its human dimension and social relevance.
  • Share evidence and good practice on equipping teachers, trainers, educational leaders and learners with the skills necessary for the use of technology in creative, critical, competent and inclusive ways
  • Analyse the needs for adequate teacher training in relation with new educational technologies.

Scope

Proposals should support the purposeful and pedagogical use of emerging technologies, including applications of artificial intelligence (AI), virtual reality (VR), augmented reality (AR) and robotics in education and training, in order to foster 21st century skills such as communication, collaboration, digital literacy, critical as well as design thinking and creativity. This in turn should allow for more personalized and flexible ways of learning, including online and blended delivery. Proposals should also examine the link with big data, learning analytics and artificial intelligence, to efficiently support distance learning. Research should focus on how different learners experience and benefit, or are excluded from, digitally enhanced learning (e.g. male and female students, students of a migrant background, students with disabilities, and/or learning difficulties, gifted and talented students, urban and rural populations, young and adult learners, etc.). Proposals should tackle as well the potential negative effects of using technologies in schools, such as cyber bullying, while also looking at the positive effects of using such technologies to increase students’ learning opportunities. In addition, the research should explore the effects of digital technologies on the learning of basic skills. It should also examine the resilience and the capacity for effective mass-deployment of e-learning capabilities in cases of crises, major emergencies such as the COVID-19 pandemic, disruptive events as well as man-made or natural disasters, which can undermine the human and social dimension of learning. Finally, it should also explore multi-stakeholder involvement and cooperation patterns in this context. The perspectives of educators, parents, and students should inform this analysis.

The action should identify barriers, enablers and framework conditions for successfully embedding emerging technologies in educational practices, including necessary innovation skills for teachers. It should also look at the positive and negative effects of digital technologies on learning, educational outcomes and basic skills. This should be done in sustainable and ecologically responsible ways, addressing accessibility in an inclusive manner, and providing for the gradual move from small-scale projects and pilots to mainstream implementation and adoption. The ethical use of data generated by digital learning platforms and tools should equally be a particular focus. Finally, the proposals should also assess potential vulnerabilities and negative unforeseen consequences, which might arise from the use of new technologies.

Proposals should analyse the shifting role of teachers, trainers and educational leaders in the digital transition affecting education and training as well as their training needs, including digital and leadership skills, required in an emerging society of permanent and quick technological change. The action should address the active involvement of educators in shaping and co-designing education and training technological products and tools. The proposals should also examine the support necessary for Initial Teacher Education institutions for the development of innovative training programmes for pre-service teachers, fostering their future digital competence and confidence.

Eligibility

Eligible non-EU countries:

  • countries associated to Horizon Europe

At the date of the publication of the work programme, there are no countries associated to Horizon Europe. Considering the Union’s interest to retain, in principle, relations with the countries associated to Horizon 2020, most third countries associated to Horizon 2020 are expected to be associated to Horizon Europe with an intention to secure uninterrupted continuity between Horizon 2020 and Horizon Europe. In addition, other third countries can also become associated to Horizon Europe during the programme. For the purposes of the eligibility conditions, applicants established in Horizon 2020 Associated Countries or in other third countries negotiating association to Horizon Europe will be treated as entities established in an Associated Country, if the Horizon Europe association agreement with the third country concerned applies at the time of signature of the grant agreement.

  • low-and middle-income countries

Legal entities which are established in countries not listed above will be eligible for funding if provided for in the specific call conditions, or if their participation is considered essential for implementing the action by the granting authority.

Specific cases:

  • Affiliated entities - Affiliated entities are eligible for funding if they are established in one of the countries listed above.
  • EU bodies - Legal entities created under EU law may also be eligible to receive funding, unless their basic act states otherwise.
  • International organisations - International European research organisations are eligible to receive funding. Unless their participation is considered essential for implementing the action by the granting authority, other international organisations are not eligible to receive funding. International organisations with headquarters in a Member State or Associated Country are eligible to receive funding for ‘Training and mobility’actions and when provided for in the specific call conditions.

Project Partners

Unless otherwise provided for in the specific call conditions, legal entities forming a consortium are eligible to participate in actions provided that the consortium includes:

  • at least one independent legal entity established in a Member State;and
  • at least two other independent legal entities, each established in different Member States or Associated Countries.

Budget

Expected EU contribution per project

The Commission estimates that an EU contribution of between EUR 2.00 and 3.00 million would allow these outcomes to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of a proposal requesting different amounts.

Indicative budget

The total indicative budget for the topic is EUR 9.00 million.

Funding rate

100%

Application Details

See full details in the official call document.

All proposals must be submitted directly online via the Funding & Tenders Portal Electronic Submission System.




Horizon Europe: Cluster 2 - Towards a new normal? Employment and social impacts of changing supply chains and declining trade intensities


Horizon Europe is the EU’s key funding programme for research and innovation.

This call aims to develop knowledge on the ongoing and expected changes and disruptions in trade patterns, global value chains and production networks.

Deadline: 07 October 2021, 17:00 Brussels time

Application Link

Overview Cluster 2, ‘Culture, Creativity and Inclusive Society’ aims to meet EU goals and priorities on enhancing democratic governance and citizens participation, on the safeguarding and promotion of cultural heritage, and to respond to and shape multifaceted social, economic, technological and cultural transformations. Cluster 2 mobilises multidisciplinary expertise of European social sciences and humanities for understanding fundamental contemporary transformations of society, economy, politics and culture. It aims to provide evidence-based policy options for a socially just and inclusive European green and digital transition and recovery.

Activities contributing to the destination "Innovative Research on Social and Economic Transformations" will help tackle social, economic and political inequalities, support human capital development and contribute to a comprehensive European strategy for inclusive growth. This also involves understanding and responding to the impacts of technological advancements and economic interconnectedness with a view to social resilience.

Background

Europe is being transformed by changes that impact the livelihoods and wellbeing of its citizens. Such changes present important opportunities for the EU to innovate and shape forward looking inclusive societies and economies, while avoiding the mistakes of the past and promoting an inclusive recovery that strengthens economic and social resilience. However, demographic changes, digitalisation, automation, environmental degradation, the transition to a low carbon economy and globalisation all pose multidimensional, interconnected and complex social and economic challenges. At the same time, there has been an increase in inequality, poverty and social exclusion, a polarisation of skill needs in the labour market, and a slowdown in convergence in income and employment in most European countries. Inequalities threaten social and territorial cohesion, economic growth and wellbeing. Moreover, the COVID-19 pandemic has magnified the pervasive inequalities across European societies, with significant differences in the way losses and costs of the COVID-19 pandemic and the crisis that followed are distributed in society. To seize the opportunities emerging from socio-economic transformations in a strongly connected and integrated world, these challenges need to be better understood and tackled.

Population ageing increases social protection spending on pensions, health and long-term care and restricts the capacity of the redistributive system to reduce inequality. Societies also need to adapt to a new role elderly people may have, with their experience and capacity to remain productive. Policies need to support a transition towards more environmentally-friendly ways of producing and providing private and public services, while ensuring all regions and individuals equally benefit from these transitions and that no one is left behind, in particular when it comes to access to essential services. Access to social protection for those in need should be ensured, while making sure that everyone can participate in economic, social, political and cultural developments. Social protection supports individuals in emergencies that they can no longer cope with on their own and, in addition, protect them by means of long-term measures – whether in the event of illness, accident, need for care, unemployment or old age. Moreover, mitigation and adaptation strategies are essential to make sure population movements shaped by these transitions are positive for all areas, and do not contribute to deepening the divide between regions or countries.

Education and training are key long-term factors in preventing and reversing inequalities and promoting equal opportunities, inclusion and social mobility. However, the educational outcomes of younger generations are still determined to a large extent by the socio-economic background of their parents rather than by their own potential. Promoting and ensuring inclusion and equity in education and training is thus fundamental in breaking these patterns.

In this context, it is important to reflect on the nature of economic growth and the need to better capture the different dimensions of social progress. It is increasingly important to distinguish between the different purposes of measurement: economic activity, social and cultural wellbeing and sustainability, and to develop relevant indicators. This is particularly the case as the pervasive effects of the COVID-19 pandemic has altered the economic performance and socio-economic fabric of many countries in Europe.

Migration has been a critical component of the makeup of European societies, one that is likely to dominate policy and political agendas for many years to come. It is an issue requiring comprehensive and coordinated European responses in order to ripen its benefits, both inside and outside the EU, involving Member States, Associated and partner countries, EU actors, as well as local and regional authorities, civil society organisations, migrants’ representatives – including migrant organisations – and economic and social partners. Partnerships between these stakeholders are needed to make the most of the positive consequences of migration, as well as ensuring that migration occurs in an orderly and dignified manner. The task of research is to better understand migration in a global and EU context, assist in its governance, support security and help the socio-economic as well as civil-political inclusion of migrants in European societies. It can enhance policies by providing evidence on the causes and consequences of the phenomena and facilitate timely response by identifying trends and suggesting possible policy solutions.

The implementation of the research activities in the two calls of this Destination will contribute to a comprehensive and reflective European strategy for inclusive growth, including social, economic, ecological and historical dimensions. This will strengthen the resilience of the EU and of its citizens, and will ensure that no one is left behind, including through the accumulation and preservation of human capital in the face of old and new risks. It will equally support productivity gains and their fair distribution, as well as boosting social and economic resilience that is essential to face situations of crisis such as in the case of COVID-19. Activities will contribute to EU migration and mobility policies, both internal and external. The overall knowledge generated, including a holistic understanding of societal wellbeing, will feed into the design of policy strategies in line with the above mentioned objectives and will facilitate the assessment of policy needs and outcomes in the field of the societal and economic transformations.

The Destination calls for proposals that may help in reaching these key strategic policy objectives in the EU. It invites proposals to do so by integrating feedback loops with stakeholders and policymakers that may help in developing suggestions and recommendations throughout their lifecycles. These proposals should take into consideration the stakeholders associated to the decisions that are suggested, and should also account for the context in which decisions are made. Therefore, in order to maximize and facilitate the uptake of group-sensitive recommendations in policy, they should include analyses of political and financial trade-offs associated to the recommendations produced, reflecting also on contextual changes needed to implement proposals developed. Proposals are also invited to build upon previous research funded by Horizon 2020, valorising its experience and findings.

Expected impacts

Proposals for topics under this Destination should set out a credible pathway to contributing to the following targeted expected impacts of the Horizon Europe Strategic Plan:

  • Social and economic resilience and sustainability are strengthened through a better understanding of the social, ethical, political and economic impacts of drivers of change (such as technology, globalisation, demographics, mobility and migration) and their interplay.

Inclusive growth is boosted and vulnerabilities are reduced effectively through evidence-based policies for protecting and enhancing employment, education, social fairness and tackling inequalities, including in response to the socio-economic challenges due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Expected Outcome

Projects are expected to contribute to all of the following expected outcomes:

  • Develop knowledge on the ongoing and expected changes and disruptions in trade patterns, global value chains and production networks.
  • Identify innovative ways to maximise the potential and mitigate the adverse social, economic and environmental impacts of changes in global value chains and international trade patterns in European urban and rural areas. Research should take into consideration impacts on employment, job quality, economic growth, income inequalities and on social cohesion and well-being.
  • Assess the impacts of the coronavirus pandemic and related public health crisis on global value chains, production networks and security of supplies, and their short- and longer-term implications for employment and social resilience in the EU.
  • Unfold policy scenarios for future value chain developments, production networks and level playing field trade relations, which will ensure security of strategic supplies, strengthen the economic resilience of societies, foster sustainable employment creation in the EU and mitigate the impacts of future trade and value chains disruptions on EU employment.
  • Produce new, innovative methodologies and ways for assessing and monitoring the level playing field developments in trade and value chains in the EU.

Scope

Globalization has expanded the value and supply chains and shifted trade patterns and dynamics. On the one hand, the fall of transportation costs, the accelerating digitalisation and the reduction of obstacles to international trade have facilitated the integration of EU companies in global value chains and supported job creation. On the other hand, the profound transformations of global value chains, trade and production networks have raised significant social, economic and environmental challenges, including increasing divergence in productivity, labour market effects in the EU, decent work and working conditions in low-cost production countries slow progress towards resource-efficiency and decarbonisation, lack of security of and access to strategic supplies.

Research should first conceptualise the actual global and sectoral trade patterns, value chains, supply chains and production networks in light of the EU’s long-term policy priorities of social resilience and competitive sustainability. It should then analyse the impacts of different trade patterns, value chains and production networks on the EU value added, labour market, income inequalities, decent work and social cohesion in urban and rural areas, taking into account gender differences. Research should develop a comparative assessment with the main strategic partners and provide innovative, forward-looking policy scenarios with recommendations for future global value chains, trade patterns and trade intensities, which will ensure security of strategic supplies, promote a high level of employment and tackle income inequalities in the EU, while safeguarding job quality and social and territorial cohesion. The policy scenarios should take into consideration analytical approaches, which will improve the economic and environmental performance of supply chains in the EU. The policy scenarios and recommendations should focus on EU, national and sectoral strategies, policy measures and targeted actions aimed at shaping fair, inclusive and sustainable trade patterns, value and supply chains as well as production networks. They should be coherent with the EU long-term policy priorities of social and economic resilience, competitive sustainability and the twin transition (digital and green).

The proposals should take into consideration the impacts of the coronavirus pandemic and the related public health crisis on trade patterns and global value chains as well as the impacts of international trade disruptions, due to the lockdown measures, on added value, EU employment, job quality, income inequality and social cohesion.

Proposals will further develop innovative methodologies for assessing and monitoring, quantitatively and qualitatively, level playing field developments in trade, value chains, supply chains and employment. The innovative methodologies should also cover level playing field developments in key policy areas of taxation, competition and social policies.

The research will deploy multi-disciplinary methodologies and target multi-dimensional aspects, developing cross-sectoral and forward-looking responses, involving external stakeholders and experts, including European social partners, regional and national authorities and international trade, labour market and social policy experts.

Eligibility

Eligible non-EU countries:

  • countries associated to Horizon Europe

At the date of the publication of the work programme, there are no countries associated to Horizon Europe. Considering the Union’s interest to retain, in principle, relations with the countries associated to Horizon 2020, most third countries associated to Horizon 2020 are expected to be associated to Horizon Europe with an intention to secure uninterrupted continuity between Horizon 2020 and Horizon Europe. In addition, other third countries can also become associated to Horizon Europe during the programme. For the purposes of the eligibility conditions, applicants established in Horizon 2020 Associated Countries or in other third countries negotiating association to Horizon Europe will be treated as entities established in an Associated Country, if the Horizon Europe association agreement with the third country concerned applies at the time of signature of the grant agreement.

  • low-and middle-income countries

Legal entities which are established in countries not listed above will be eligible for funding if provided for in the specific call conditions, or if their participation is considered essential for implementing the action by the granting authority.

Specific cases:

  • Affiliated entities - Affiliated entities are eligible for funding if they are established in one of the countries listed above.
  • EU bodies - Legal entities created under EU law may also be eligible to receive funding, unless their basic act states otherwise.
  • International organisations - International European research organisations are eligible to receive funding. Unless their participation is considered essential for implementing the action by the granting authority, other international organisations are not eligible to receive funding. International organisations with headquarters in a Member State or Associated Country are eligible to receive funding for ‘Training and mobility’actions and when provided for in the specific call conditions.

Project Partners

Unless otherwise provided for in the specific call conditions, legal entities forming a consortium are eligible to participate in actions provided that the consortium includes:

  • at least one independent legal entity established in a Member State;and
  • at least two other independent legal entities, each established in different Member States or Associated Countries.

Budget

Expected EU contribution per project

The Commission estimates that an EU contribution of between EUR 2.00 and 3.00 million would allow these outcomes to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of a proposal requesting different amounts.

Indicative budget

The total indicative budget for the topic is EUR 9.00 million.

Funding rate

100%

Application Details

See full details in the official call document.

All proposals must be submitted directly online via the Funding & Tenders Portal Electronic Submission System.




Horizon Europe: Cluster 2 - Estimates of irregular migrants in Europe - stakeholder network


Horizon Europe is the EU’s key funding programme for research and innovation.

This call aims to enhance EU migration governance by providing a review of estimates on irregular migrants living in the EU, including those working.

Deadline: 07 October 2021, 17:00 Brussels time


Application Link

Overview Cluster 2, ‘Culture, Creativity and Inclusive Society’ aims to meet EU goals and priorities on enhancing democratic governance and citizens participation, on the safeguarding and promotion of cultural heritage, and to respond to and shape multifaceted social, economic, technological and cultural transformations. Cluster 2 mobilises multidisciplinary expertise of European social sciences and humanities for understanding fundamental contemporary transformations of society, economy, politics and culture. It aims to provide evidence-based policy options for a socially just and inclusive European green and digital transition and recovery.

Activities contributing to the destination "Innovative Research on Social and Economic Transformations" will help tackle social, economic and political inequalities, support human capital development and contribute to a comprehensive European strategy for inclusive growth. This also involves understanding and responding to the impacts of technological advancements and economic interconnectedness with a view to social resilience.

Background

Europe is being transformed by changes that impact the livelihoods and wellbeing of its citizens. Such changes present important opportunities for the EU to innovate and shape forward looking inclusive societies and economies, while avoiding the mistakes of the past and promoting an inclusive recovery that strengthens economic and social resilience. However, demographic changes, digitalisation, automation, environmental degradation, the transition to a low carbon economy and globalisation all pose multidimensional, interconnected and complex social and economic challenges. At the same time, there has been an increase in inequality, poverty and social exclusion, a polarisation of skill needs in the labour market, and a slowdown in convergence in income and employment in most European countries. Inequalities threaten social and territorial cohesion, economic growth and wellbeing. Moreover, the COVID-19 pandemic has magnified the pervasive inequalities across European societies, with significant differences in the way losses and costs of the COVID-19 pandemic and the crisis that followed are distributed in society. To seize the opportunities emerging from socio-economic transformations in a strongly connected and integrated world, these challenges need to be better understood and tackled.

Population ageing increases social protection spending on pensions, health and long-term care and restricts the capacity of the redistributive system to reduce inequality. Societies also need to adapt to a new role elderly people may have, with their experience and capacity to remain productive. Policies need to support a transition towards more environmentally-friendly ways of producing and providing private and public services, while ensuring all regions and individuals equally benefit from these transitions and that no one is left behind, in particular when it comes to access to essential services. Access to social protection for those in need should be ensured, while making sure that everyone can participate in economic, social, political and cultural developments. Social protection supports individuals in emergencies that they can no longer cope with on their own and, in addition, protect them by means of long-term measures – whether in the event of illness, accident, need for care, unemployment or old age. Moreover, mitigation and adaptation strategies are essential to make sure population movements shaped by these transitions are positive for all areas, and do not contribute to deepening the divide between regions or countries.

Education and training are key long-term factors in preventing and reversing inequalities and promoting equal opportunities, inclusion and social mobility. However, the educational outcomes of younger generations are still determined to a large extent by the socio-economic background of their parents rather than by their own potential. Promoting and ensuring inclusion and equity in education and training is thus fundamental in breaking these patterns.

In this context, it is important to reflect on the nature of economic growth and the need to better capture the different dimensions of social progress. It is increasingly important to distinguish between the different purposes of measurement: economic activity, social and cultural wellbeing and sustainability, and to develop relevant indicators. This is particularly the case as the pervasive effects of the COVID-19 pandemic has altered the economic performance and socio-economic fabric of many countries in Europe.

Migration has been a critical component of the makeup of European societies, one that is likely to dominate policy and political agendas for many years to come. It is an issue requiring comprehensive and coordinated European responses in order to ripen its benefits, both inside and outside the EU, involving Member States, Associated and partner countries, EU actors, as well as local and regional authorities, civil society organisations, migrants’ representatives – including migrant organisations – and economic and social partners. Partnerships between these stakeholders are needed to make the most of the positive consequences of migration, as well as ensuring that migration occurs in an orderly and dignified manner. The task of research is to better understand migration in a global and EU context, assist in its governance, support security and help the socio-economic as well as civil-political inclusion of migrants in European societies. It can enhance policies by providing evidence on the causes and consequences of the phenomena and facilitate timely response by identifying trends and suggesting possible policy solutions.

The implementation of the research activities in the two calls of this Destination will contribute to a comprehensive and reflective European strategy for inclusive growth, including social, economic, ecological and historical dimensions. This will strengthen the resilience of the EU and of its citizens, and will ensure that no one is left behind, including through the accumulation and preservation of human capital in the face of old and new risks. It will equally support productivity gains and their fair distribution, as well as boosting social and economic resilience that is essential to face situations of crisis such as in the case of COVID-19. Activities will contribute to EU migration and mobility policies, both internal and external. The overall knowledge generated, including a holistic understanding of societal wellbeing, will feed into the design of policy strategies in line with the above mentioned objectives and will facilitate the assessment of policy needs and outcomes in the field of the societal and economic transformations.

The Destination calls for proposals that may help in reaching these key strategic policy objectives in the EU. It invites proposals to do so by integrating feedback loops with stakeholders and policymakers that may help in developing suggestions and recommendations throughout their lifecycles. These proposals should take into consideration the stakeholders associated to the decisions that are suggested, and should also account for the context in which decisions are made. Therefore, in order to maximize and facilitate the uptake of group-sensitive recommendations in policy, they should include analyses of political and financial trade-offs associated to the recommendations produced, reflecting also on contextual changes needed to implement proposals developed. Proposals are also invited to build upon previous research funded by Horizon 2020, valorising its experience and findings.

Expected impacts

Proposals for topics under this Destination should set out a credible pathway to contributing to the following targeted expected impacts of the Horizon Europe Strategic Plan:

  • Social and economic resilience and sustainability are strengthened through a better understanding of the social, ethical, political and economic impacts of drivers of change (such as technology, globalisation, demographics, mobility and migration) and their interplay.

Inclusive growth is boosted and vulnerabilities are reduced effectively through evidence-based policies for protecting and enhancing employment, education, social fairness and tackling inequalities, including in response to the socio-economic challenges due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Expected Outcome

Projects should contribute to all of the following expected outcomes:

  • Enhance EU migration governance by providing a rigorous review of estimates on irregular migrants living in the EU, including those working.
  • Enhance statistics and data on migration by developing methodologies to estimate the number of irregular migrants across different EU legislative and statistical contexts.
  • Assess viability, costs and economic, socio-demographic and health benefits of regularisation programs, including consideration for their possible signalling effect to incentivise further migration. Propose EU and context specific policy measures accordingly, in articulation with the general EU migration management framework.

Scope

Irregular migrants are, by definition, difficult to capture in population statistics. As such, it remains unknown how many irregular migrants are in the EU and in the various EU Member States today. This is a challenge, given that policymakers have limited capacity to develop policies targeted to a group of people that is ill-defined. This is even more challenging in situations such as the Covid-19 pandemic, given the difficulties in accounting for a sizeable part of population ‘in the shadows’.

Proposals should comparatively assess legal frameworks across the EU that determine the irregular status of migrants (also considering the issue of ‘tolerated status’), and comprehensively assess their impact. Proposals should also evaluate this against existing statistics, analysing who is counted as regular, who as irregular and consequent discrepancies in datasets across Europe resulting from different methodologies and policy frameworks. Thereby, proposals should determine effective methodologies to address such issues. To the extent possible, they should also use available datasets to estimate number of irregular migrants residing in Member States. Project proposals should focus on at least 10 EU countries with a geographical balance across the EU. Proposals are encouraged to account for the sustainability of the project building a pan-European network with the potential to sustain and update estimates through time.

Proposals should also build a network of stakeholders from different national contexts, including, but not limited to, researchers, policymakers (from both EU institutions and Member States), civil society and employers. This network should develop an overview and review of existing knowledge on regularisation schemes for irregular migrants, presenting policy suggestions by identifying what works and what does not. In doing so, it should identify what financial and political costs are associated with the options suggested, considering the relation of this policy with the broader migration management framework.

Eligibility

Eligible non-EU countries:

  • countries associated to Horizon Europe

At the date of the publication of the work programme, there are no countries associated to Horizon Europe. Considering the Union’s interest to retain, in principle, relations with the countries associated to Horizon 2020, most third countries associated to Horizon 2020 are expected to be associated to Horizon Europe with an intention to secure uninterrupted continuity between Horizon 2020 and Horizon Europe. In addition, other third countries can also become associated to Horizon Europe during the programme. For the purposes of the eligibility conditions, applicants established in Horizon 2020 Associated Countries or in other third countries negotiating association to Horizon Europe will be treated as entities established in an Associated Country, if the Horizon Europe association agreement with the third country concerned applies at the time of signature of the grant agreement.

  • low-and middle-income countries

Legal entities which are established in countries not listed above will be eligible for funding if provided for in the specific call conditions, or if their participation is considered essential for implementing the action by the granting authority.

Specific cases:

  • Affiliated entities - Affiliated entities are eligible for funding if they are established in one of the countries listed above.
  • EU bodies - Legal entities created under EU law may also be eligible to receive funding, unless their basic act states otherwise.
  • International organisations - International European research organisations are eligible to receive funding. Unless their participation is considered essential for implementing the action by the granting authority, other international organisations are not eligible to receive funding. International organisations with headquarters in a Member State or Associated Country are eligible to receive funding for ‘Training and mobility’actions and when provided for in the specific call conditions.

Project Partners

Unless otherwise provided for in the specific call conditions, legal entities forming a consortium are eligible to participate in actions provided that the consortium includes:

  • at least one independent legal entity established in a Member State;and
  • at least two other independent legal entities, each established in different Member States or Associated Countries.

Budget

Expected EU contribution per project

The Commission estimates that an EU contribution of between EUR 2.00 and 3.00 million would allow these outcomes to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of a proposal requesting different amounts.

Indicative budget

The total indicative budget for the topic is EUR 3.00 million.

Funding rate

100%

Application Details

See full details in the official call document.

All proposals must be submitted directly online via the Funding & Tenders Portal Electronic Submission System.




Horizon Europe: Cluster 2 - Determining key drivers of inequality trends


Horizon Europe is the EU’s key funding programme for research and innovation.

This call aims to analyse the main reasons for the increasing inequalities reported in the last decades worldwide and, thereby, identify whether this is primarily policy driven and/or the result of different factors related to globalisation and technological innovations.

Deadline: 07 October 2021, 17:00 Brussels time

Application Link

Overview Cluster 2, ‘Culture, Creativity and Inclusive Society’ aims to meet EU goals and priorities on enhancing democratic governance and citizens participation, on the safeguarding and promotion of cultural heritage, and to respond to and shape multifaceted social, economic, technological and cultural transformations. Cluster 2 mobilises multidisciplinary expertise of European social sciences and humanities for understanding fundamental contemporary transformations of society, economy, politics and culture. It aims to provide evidence-based policy options for a socially just and inclusive European green and digital transition and recovery.

Activities contributing to the destination "Innovative Research on Social and Economic Transformations" will help tackle social, economic and political inequalities, support human capital development and contribute to a comprehensive European strategy for inclusive growth. This also involves understanding and responding to the impacts of technological advancements and economic interconnectedness with a view to social resilience.

Background

Europe is being transformed by changes that impact the livelihoods and wellbeing of its citizens. Such changes present important opportunities for the EU to innovate and shape forward looking inclusive societies and economies, while avoiding the mistakes of the past and promoting an inclusive recovery that strengthens economic and social resilience. However, demographic changes, digitalisation, automation, environmental degradation, the transition to a low carbon economy and globalisation all pose multidimensional, interconnected and complex social and economic challenges. At the same time, there has been an increase in inequality, poverty and social exclusion, a polarisation of skill needs in the labour market, and a slowdown in convergence in income and employment in most European countries. Inequalities threaten social and territorial cohesion, economic growth and wellbeing. Moreover, the COVID-19 pandemic has magnified the pervasive inequalities across European societies, with significant differences in the way losses and costs of the COVID-19 pandemic and the crisis that followed are distributed in society. To seize the opportunities emerging from socio-economic transformations in a strongly connected and integrated world, these challenges need to be better understood and tackled.

Population ageing increases social protection spending on pensions, health and long-term care and restricts the capacity of the redistributive system to reduce inequality. Societies also need to adapt to a new role elderly people may have, with their experience and capacity to remain productive. Policies need to support a transition towards more environmentally-friendly ways of producing and providing private and public services, while ensuring all regions and individuals equally benefit from these transitions and that no one is left behind, in particular when it comes to access to essential services. Access to social protection for those in need should be ensured, while making sure that everyone can participate in economic, social, political and cultural developments. Social protection supports individuals in emergencies that they can no longer cope with on their own and, in addition, protect them by means of long-term measures – whether in the event of illness, accident, need for care, unemployment or old age. Moreover, mitigation and adaptation strategies are essential to make sure population movements shaped by these transitions are positive for all areas, and do not contribute to deepening the divide between regions or countries.

Education and training are key long-term factors in preventing and reversing inequalities and promoting equal opportunities, inclusion and social mobility. However, the educational outcomes of younger generations are still determined to a large extent by the socio-economic background of their parents rather than by their own potential. Promoting and ensuring inclusion and equity in education and training is thus fundamental in breaking these patterns.

In this context, it is important to reflect on the nature of economic growth and the need to better capture the different dimensions of social progress. It is increasingly important to distinguish between the different purposes of measurement: economic activity, social and cultural wellbeing and sustainability, and to develop relevant indicators. This is particularly the case as the pervasive effects of the COVID-19 pandemic has altered the economic performance and socio-economic fabric of many countries in Europe.

Migration has been a critical component of the makeup of European societies, one that is likely to dominate policy and political agendas for many years to come. It is an issue requiring comprehensive and coordinated European responses in order to ripen its benefits, both inside and outside the EU, involving Member States, Associated and partner countries, EU actors, as well as local and regional authorities, civil society organisations, migrants’ representatives – including migrant organisations – and economic and social partners. Partnerships between these stakeholders are needed to make the most of the positive consequences of migration, as well as ensuring that migration occurs in an orderly and dignified manner. The task of research is to better understand migration in a global and EU context, assist in its governance, support security and help the socio-economic as well as civil-political inclusion of migrants in European societies. It can enhance policies by providing evidence on the causes and consequences of the phenomena and facilitate timely response by identifying trends and suggesting possible policy solutions.

The implementation of the research activities in the two calls of this Destination will contribute to a comprehensive and reflective European strategy for inclusive growth, including social, economic, ecological and historical dimensions. This will strengthen the resilience of the EU and of its citizens, and will ensure that no one is left behind, including through the accumulation and preservation of human capital in the face of old and new risks. It will equally support productivity gains and their fair distribution, as well as boosting social and economic resilience that is essential to face situations of crisis such as in the case of COVID-19. Activities will contribute to EU migration and mobility policies, both internal and external. The overall knowledge generated, including a holistic understanding of societal wellbeing, will feed into the design of policy strategies in line with the above mentioned objectives and will facilitate the assessment of policy needs and outcomes in the field of the societal and economic transformations.

The Destination calls for proposals that may help in reaching these key strategic policy objectives in the EU. It invites proposals to do so by integrating feedback loops with stakeholders and policymakers that may help in developing suggestions and recommendations throughout their lifecycles. These proposals should take into consideration the stakeholders associated to the decisions that are suggested, and should also account for the context in which decisions are made. Therefore, in order to maximize and facilitate the uptake of group-sensitive recommendations in policy, they should include analyses of political and financial trade-offs associated to the recommendations produced, reflecting also on contextual changes needed to implement proposals developed. Proposals are also invited to build upon previous research funded by Horizon 2020, valorising its experience and findings.

Expected impacts

Proposals for topics under this Destination should set out a credible pathway to contributing to the following targeted expected impacts of the Horizon Europe Strategic Plan:

  • Social and economic resilience and sustainability are strengthened through a better understanding of the social, ethical, political and economic impacts of drivers of change (such as technology, globalisation, demographics, mobility and migration) and their interplay.

Inclusive growth is boosted and vulnerabilities are reduced effectively through evidence-based policies for protecting and enhancing employment, education, social fairness and tackling inequalities, including in response to the socio-economic challenges due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Expected Outcome

Projects should contribute to all of the following expected outcomes:

  • Analyse the main drivers of inequality trends, considering both inequality of opportunities and inequality of outcomes in terms of conditions of life, economic resources and health, analyse the interplay between inequalities in different spheres of life, and identify policy factors for tackling them.
  • Identify and analyse different drivers of inequalities at the local, regional, national and supranational level and identify the governance levels best placed to act.
  • Produce research evidence, guidance and recommendations for policy-makers, social partners, firms and stakeholders to tackle unsustainable trends and reverse inequalities.
  • Understand key drivers of increasing territorial inequalities and identify policy factors at different governance levels for tackling urban and rural decline.
  • Understand how people perceive these inequalities (depending on culture, age, gender, etc.)

Scope

In the light of increasing economic and social inequalities and regional disparities in terms of both economic and other outcomes and opportunities, research should analyse the main reasons for the increasing inequalities reported in the last decades worldwide and, thereby, identify whether this is primarily policy driven and/or the result of different factors related to globalisation and technological innovations. More specifically, research should examine whether inequality dynamics are determined by different trends:

  • pre-market processes including the transfer of inequalities and resources across generations (the role of cultural capital, unequal familial and background factors, paying special attention to single-parent families with dependent children; unequal access to education and training of adequate quality and content at all levels, including early childhood education and care, digital skills training or to employment counselling)
  • in-market processes (labour market dynamics and institutions including employment contracts and working conditions, capital and goods market structure; increasing relevance of superstar firms; globalized value chains, allocation of labour on a global scale, diffusion of innovation across firms)
  • post-market processes (tax-benefit policies)
  • other processes (public policies, tax evasion, discrimination, digital inequality, institutionalised racism, gender gap, effects of the COVID-19 pandemic, climate change, etc.)
  • the dynamic interplay between different forms of inequalities across different spheres and stages of life.

Research should also identify means to attenuate the trends of increasing inequalities. Part of the reasons for the rising inequalities may come from suboptimal labour market dynamics. Research should therefore also analyse the main features and institutional set up determining effective and well-performing labour markets, also with the view to help accelerating labour market and economic convergence within Member States and across EU Member States.

Research should consider and advise on how current social, cultural, and economic transformations should be best steered, so that they are fair and socially just, and do not further increase existing inequalities or create new ones. Research should include a focus on territorial inequalities and the loss of economic weight of the middle-class and on the COVID-19 economic crisis, with its unequal distributional effects for those suffering the most. Local and regional levels seem to gain momentum, but comparative research is needed in order to understand the roles of local and regional stakeholders in the struggle with inequalities. Almost everywhere in the European Union, territorial inequalities are producing what has been recently labelled as “left-behind places” in which “mainstream” development policies fail to reverse the trends of increasing inequalities. It is therefore important to compare the capacity of local stakeholders in such declining urban and rural territories to implement innovative redevelopment policies based on a better understanding of the local assets of “left-behind places”. Finally, research may assess how the digitalisation of societies (and in particular the public sector) can contribute to reducing inequalities (e.g. reducing digital skills gap, engaging vulnerable groups in the policymaking process, more inclusive digital public services policies).

Eligibility

Eligible non-EU countries:

  • countries associated to Horizon Europe

At the date of the publication of the work programme, there are no countries associated to Horizon Europe. Considering the Union’s interest to retain, in principle, relations with the countries associated to Horizon 2020, most third countries associated to Horizon 2020 are expected to be associated to Horizon Europe with an intention to secure uninterrupted continuity between Horizon 2020 and Horizon Europe. In addition, other third countries can also become associated to Horizon Europe during the programme. For the purposes of the eligibility conditions, applicants established in Horizon 2020 Associated Countries or in other third countries negotiating association to Horizon Europe will be treated as entities established in an Associated Country, if the Horizon Europe association agreement with the third country concerned applies at the time of signature of the grant agreement.

  • low-and middle-income countries

Legal entities which are established in countries not listed above will be eligible for funding if provided for in the specific call conditions, or if their participation is considered essential for implementing the action by the granting authority.

Specific cases:

  • Affiliated entities - Affiliated entities are eligible for funding if they are established in one of the countries listed above.
  • EU bodies - Legal entities created under EU law may also be eligible to receive funding, unless their basic act states otherwise.
  • International organisations - International European research organisations are eligible to receive funding. Unless their participation is considered essential for implementing the action by the granting authority, other international organisations are not eligible to receive funding. International organisations with headquarters in a Member State or Associated Country are eligible to receive funding for ‘Training and mobility’actions and when provided for in the specific call conditions.

Project Partners

Unless otherwise provided for in the specific call conditions, legal entities forming a consortium are eligible to participate in actions provided that the consortium includes:

  • at least one independent legal entity established in a Member State;and
  • at least two other independent legal entities, each established in different Member States or Associated Countries.

Budget

Expected EU contribution per project

The Commission estimates that an EU contribution of between EUR 2.00 and 3.00 million would allow these outcomes to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of a proposal requesting different amounts.

Indicative budget

The total indicative budget for the topic is EUR 10.00 million.

Funding rate

100%

Application Details

See full details in the official call document.

All proposals must be submitted directly online via the Funding & Tenders Portal Electronic Submission System.




Horizon Europe: Cluster 2 - Feminisms for a new age of democracy


Horizon Europe is the EU’s key funding programme for research and innovation.

This call aims to examine the contribution of modern theoretical frameworks of feminist thought and gender analysis as well as activism and political practices, to the renewal of fundamental political concepts in modern democratic contexts across the EU and beyond.

Deadline: 07 October 2021, 17:00 Brussels time

Application Link Overview Cluster 2, ‘Culture, Creativity and Inclusive Society’ aims to meet EU goals and priorities on enhancing democratic governance and citizens participation, on the safeguarding and promotion of cultural heritage, and to respond to and shape multifaceted social, economic, technological and cultural transformations. Cluster 2 mobilises multidisciplinary expertise of European social sciences and humanities for understanding fundamental contemporary transformations of society, economy, politics and culture. It aims to provide evidence-based policy options for a socially just and inclusive European green and digital transition and recovery. Activities contributing to the destination "Innovative Research on Democracy and Governance", will provide knowledge, data, scientifically robust recommendations to reinvigorate democratic governance and improve trust in democratic institutions. In the long-term, this will contribute to help safeguard fundamental rights to empower active and inclusive citizenship. By doing so, they will also strengthen accountability, transparency, effectiveness and trustworthiness of rule of law-based institutions and policies. Activities will develop recommendations to protect liberties and the rule of law, and shield democracy from multidimensional threats. They will aim to expand political participation, social dialogue and social inclusion, civic engagement and gender equality.

Background

Democracies are more fragile and more vulnerable than in the past. The Freedom in the World Report (2020) shows that democracies across the globe are in crisis1. At the same time, various European surveys show declining levels of trust in the political institutions of democracy.2 In terms of legitimacy, there are signs of a potential shift from governance based on expertise, multilateralism and consensual policymaking towards majoritarianism, unilateralism, nationalism, populism and polarization. Research on the past and present challenges and tensions in democracy can help to better understand and strengthen democracy, its resilience and stability. It will foster democracy’s further development with a view to enhancing representation, participation, openness, pluralism, tolerance, the effectiveness of public policy, non-discrimination, civic engagement, the protection of fundamental rights and the rule of law. These reflect the European Union’s values as defined in Article 2 of the EU Treaty.

Expected impact

Proposals for topics under this Destination should set out a credible pathway to contributing to the following expected impacts of the Horizon Europe Strategic Plan:

  • Democratic governance is reinvigorated by improving the accountability, transparency, effectiveness and trustworthiness of rule-of-law based institutions and policies and through the expansion of active and inclusive citizenship empowered by the safeguarding of fundamental rights.

The implementation of the research activities of the destination will assist in the re-invigoration and modernisation of democratic governance. The aim is to develop evidence-based innovations, policies and policy recommendations, as well as institutional frameworks that expand political participation, social dialogue, civic engagement, gender equality and inclusiveness. Activities will also contribute to enhancing the transparency, effectiveness, accountability and legitimacy of public policy-making. They will help improving trust in democratic institutions, safeguarding liberties and the rule of law and protecting democracy from multidimensional threats. Rich historical, cultural and philosophical perspectives, including a comparative dimension, will set the frame for soundly understanding present developments and help to map future pathways. In the medium to long term, the knowledge, data, scientifically robust recommendations and innovations generated will enhance decision making on all aspects relevant to democratic governance. As the Destination aims directly at citizen engagement and at producing lasting change, it is of particular importance that the research and innovation actions promote the highest standards of transparency and openness. When applicable, it is encouraged to open up the process, criteria, methodologies and data to civil society in the course of the research.

Expected Outcome

Projects are expected to contribute to both of the following expected outcomes:

  • Promote gender equality theoretically and practically through policy recommendations, tools, and solutions for civil society organisations and other stakeholders. As a result, support the quality of democratic governance in more inclusive European societies.
  • Understand how feminism and gender are used in extreme populist discourses, and counter gender-equality repressive strategies and policies.

Scope

Gender equality is a fundamental value of the European Union and lies at the core of European democracy. This is reinforced by the Gender Equality Strategy 2020-2025, adopted by the European Commission, which recognises that much remains to be done to ensure true gender equality in our democratic processes. Recent developments, such as the #MeToo movement, have given new impetus to feminist discourses and politics. At the same time, however, there has been a societal and political backlash against feminism centred around traditionalist, masculinist and authoritarian discourses. Research is needed on the theory and practice of feminism(s), in the face of a changed and changing reality in the EU and beyond, including in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Projects are expected to address some of the following points: To examine the contribution of modern theoretical frameworks of feminist thought and gender analysis – including, e.g., care ethics, ecofeminism, intersectional theory and inclusive feminism, queer theory, masculinity studies –, as well as activism and political practices, to the renewal of fundamental political concepts like equality, identity, solidarity, order, security, individual and collective rights, participation, dialogue, etc. in modern democratic contexts across the EU and beyond. Research should investigate the strategies and effects of anti-gender and anti-feminist mobilisations in the EU and beyond – including, e.g., the use of traditional and social media, online hate speech and harassment, demonstrations, as well as restrictions to academic freedom – and their connections with the positioning of extreme populist discourses, political actors and traditionalist religious movements.

Based on the evidence collected and analysed, proposals should develop approaches and methods to effectively ‘engender’ democracy and spaces of democratic participation and governance, taking into account intersections between gender and other social categories such social class, ethnicity, sexual orientation, religion etc. in European societies (intersectionality), and practically counteract anti-gender equality and anti-feminist discursive strategies and backlash tactics.

Eligibility

Eligible non-EU countries:

  • countries associated to Horizon Europe

At the date of the publication of the work programme, there are no countries associated to Horizon Europe. Considering the Union’s interest to retain, in principle, relations with the countries associated to Horizon 2020, most third countries associated to Horizon 2020 are expected to be associated to Horizon Europe with an intention to secure uninterrupted continuity between Horizon 2020 and Horizon Europe. In addition, other third countries can also become associated to Horizon Europe during the programme. For the purposes of the eligibility conditions, applicants established in Horizon 2020 Associated Countries or in other third countries negotiating association to Horizon Europe will be treated as entities established in an Associated Country, if the Horizon Europe association agreement with the third country concerned applies at the time of signature of the grant agreement.

  • low-and middle-income countries

Legal entities which are established in countries not listed above will be eligible for funding if provided for in the specific call conditions, or if their participation is considered essential for implementing the action by the granting authority.

Specific cases:

  • Affiliated entities - Affiliated entities are eligible for funding if they are established in one of the countries listed above.
  • EU bodies - Legal entities created under EU law may also be eligible to receive funding, unless their basic act states otherwise.
  • International organisations - International European research organisations are eligible to receive funding. Unless their participation is considered essential for implementing the action by the granting authority, other international organisations are not eligible to receive funding. International organisations with headquarters in a Member State or Associated Country are eligible to receive funding for ‘Training and mobility’actions and when provided for in the specific call conditions.

Project Partners

Unless otherwise provided for in the specific call conditions , legal entities forming a consortium are eligible to participate in actions provided that the consortium includes:

  • at least one independent legal entity established in a Member State;and
  • at least two other independent legal entities, each established in different Member States or Associated Countries.

Budget

Expected EU contribution per project

The Commission estimates that an EU contribution of between EUR 2.00 and 3.00 million would allow these outcomes to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of a proposal requesting different amounts.

Indicative budget

The total indicative budget for the topic is EUR 9.90 million.

Funding rate

100%

Application Details

See full details in the official call document.

All proposals must be submitted directly online via the Funding & Tenders Portal Electronic Submission System.




Horizon Europe: Pillar 3 - Modelling and quantifying the impacts of open science practice


Horizon Europe is the EU’s key funding programme for research and innovation.

The aim of this call is to produce structured evidence of scientific, societal and economic impacts of open science practice, complemented by the new methods, tools and data required to measure them.

Deadline: 23 September 2021, 17:00 Brussels time

Application Link Overview

Open science consists of sharing knowledge and data as early as possible in the research process, in open collaboration with all relevant actors, including citizens. The mainstreaming of open science practice is driven by expected impacts:

  • on the research system, e.g. increased efficiency, better reliability, and better responsiveness towards societal challenges;
  • on the innovation system, e.g. faster innovation when results are shared earlier, and innovations more directed towards societal challenges;
  • on the interface between science and society, e.g. more productive interactions among academia and other knowledge actors, and higher trust of society in the science system when researchers and citizens are engaged.

While past projects have started building an evidence base, this remains fragmented and incomplete. A broad and comprehensive evidence base would help define new policies for open science, drive further uptake and help communicate on open science.

Activities to be funded

Proposals are expected to:

  • systematise and evaluate the validity and robustness of existing literature, data and evidence of impacts of open science practice, including potential legal and licensing issues;
  • leverage and valorise the body of knowledge resulting from the Science and Society (FP6), Science in Society (FP7) and Science with and for Society (Horizon 2020) programmes;
  • complement existing evidence and develop scientific methodologies and models to capture impacts, notably those relating to socio-economic, including gender equality related, environmental and public health aspects. It is in particular expected to develop and implement methods for measuring the contribution of open science practice to the reproducibility of research results, and the implications of involving citizens, civil society and end-users in R&I;
  • perform cost/benefit analyses of open science practice and conduct research to identify by which causality/mechanisms the impacts develop.

Eligibility

To be eligible for funding, applicants must be established in one of the eligible countries, i.e.:

  • the Member States of the European Union, including their outermost regions;
  • the Overseas Countries and Territories (OCTs) linked to the Member States;
  • eligible non-EU countries:
    • countries associated to Horizon Europe
    • low and middle-income countries

At the date of the publication of the work programme, there are no countries associated to Horizon Europe. Considering the Union’s interest to retain, in principle, relations with the countries associated to Horizon 2020, most third countries associated to Horizon 2020 are expected to be associated to Horizon Europe with an intention to secure uninterrupted continuity between Horizon 2020 and Horizon Europe. In addition, other third countries can also become associated to Horizon Europe during the programme. For the purposes of the eligibility conditions, applicants established in Horizon 2020 Associated Countries or in other third countries negotiating association to Horizon Europe will be treated as entities established in an Associated Country, if the Horizon Europe association agreement with the third country concerned applies at the time of signature of the grant agreement

Legal entities which are established in countries not listed above will be eligible for funding if provided for in the specific call conditions, or if their participation is considered essential for implementing the action by the granting authority.

Consortium Composition

Unless otherwise provided for in the specific call conditions, legal entities forming a consortium are eligible to participate in actions provided that the consortium includes:

  • at least one independent legal entity established in a Member State;and
  • at least two other independent legal entities, each established in different Member States or Associated Countries.

Project Duration

The action should be no shorter than 3 years.

Budget

  • Expected EU contribution per project:

The Commission estimates that an EU contribution of around EUR 2.00 million would allow these outcomes to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of a proposal requesting different amounts.

  • Indicative budget:

The total indicative budget for the topic is EUR 2.00 million.

  • Funding rate:

100%

Application Details

See full details in the official call document.

All proposals must be submitted directly online via the Funding & Tenders Portal Electronic Submission System.




Horizon Europe: Pillar 3 - Societal trust in science, research and innovation


Horizon Europe is the EU’s key funding programme for research and innovation.

The aim of this call is to produce recommendations for research and innovation actors for tackling societal mistrust in science, research and innovation.

Deadline: 23 September 2021, 17:00 Brussels time

Application Link Overview

Societal trust in the research system and confidence in its outcomes is vital to ensure the EU’s contribution to attain the Sustainable Development Goals and to achieve the European Green Deal targets; for the uptake of innovation in society; and for continued public support for investment in R&I. Trust depends on scientists and engineers’ capacity to demonstrate high standards of research integrity, an ethical mind-set, critical thinking and rigorous exploration of ideas in an open, transparent manner; and their desire to maximise the societal relevance, robustness and overall quality of outcomes. This, in turn, is fostered by conducive institutional governance arrangements and policy environments. In addition, citizen and civil society’s involvement in co-creating R&I agendas and contents makes research more relevant and responsive to society and strengthens co-ownership and trust in scientific evidence and innovation.

Projects are expected to contribute to the following expected outcomes:

  • Recommendations for policy makers, research funding and performing organisations, higher education institutions and other research and innovation actors for tackling societal mistrust in science, research and innovation;
  • Recommendations for strengthening the co-creation of R&I contents by society, and for the spreading of good practices and evidence of their effects.

Activities to be funded

To better understand the nature and scale of the sources and consequences of mistrust of society in science and the challenges of science-society co-creation, a series of expert workshops, small-scale studies and participatory research actions should take into account existing knowledge (including from projects funded under previous Framework Programmes) and should lead to new and robust evidence and analysis, as a basis for further policy action. Evidence from relevant Eurobarometers, and national science barometers, should form particularly important inputs to this action.

The action should involve a broad range of potential users and stakeholders and the general public in co-creation (e.g. civil society, businesses, research/academia, public authorities and policy makers), develop policy guidance and recommendations, and implement innovative means of communicating and disseminating the findings and messages. As such, Responsible Research and Innovation could be a relevant research approach. Close co-operation should be sought with relevant projects to encourage uptake and early sharing of knowledge and evidence.

Eligibility

To be eligible for funding, applicants must be established in one of the eligible countries, i.e.:

  • the Member States of the European Union, including their outermost regions;
  • the Overseas Countries and Territories (OCTs) linked to the Member States;
  • eligible non-EU countries:
    • countries associated to Horizon Europe
    • low and middle-income countries

At the date of the publication of the work programme, there are no countries associated to Horizon Europe. Considering the Union’s interest to retain, in principle, relations with the countries associated to Horizon 2020, most third countries associated to Horizon 2020 are expected to be associated to Horizon Europe with an intention to secure uninterrupted continuity between Horizon 2020 and Horizon Europe. In addition, other third countries can also become associated to Horizon Europe during the programme. For the purposes of the eligibility conditions, applicants established in Horizon 2020 Associated Countries or in other third countries negotiating association to Horizon Europe will be treated as entities established in an Associated Country, if the Horizon Europe association agreement with the third country concerned applies at the time of signature of the grant agreement

Legal entities which are established in countries not listed above will be eligible for funding if provided for in the specific call conditions, or if their participation is considered essential for implementing the action by the granting authority.

Consortium Composition

Unless otherwise provided for in the specific call conditions, legal entities forming a consortium are eligible to participate in actions provided that the consortium includes:

  • at least one independent legal entity established in a Member State;and
  • at least two other independent legal entities, each established in different Member States or Associated Countries.

Project Duration

The action should be no shorter than 3 years.

Budget

  • Expected EU contribution per project:

The Commission estimates that an EU contribution of around EUR 2.00 million would allow these outcomes to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of a proposal requesting different amounts.

  • Indicative budget:

The total indicative budget for the topic is EUR 2.00 million.

  • Funding rate:

100%

Application Details

See full details in the official call document.

All proposals must be submitted directly online via the Funding & Tenders Portal Electronic Submission System.




Horizon Europe: Pillar 3 - Supporting and giving recognition to citizen science in the European Research Area


Horizon Europe is the EU’s key funding programme for research and innovation.

The aim of this call is to kick-start experimental citizen science initiatives and to support existing citizen science initiatives to become sustainable.

Deadline: 23 September 2021, 17:00 Brussels time

Application Link Overview

Citizen Science is a rapidly emerging mode of research and innovation that shows huge promise in terms of collecting new qualities and quantities of data, harnessing collective intelligence, improving science-society literacy, and improving the relationship between science and society. However, financial support is not well adapted to the needs of small-scale and experimental activities and many citizen science initiatives that have proven their worth fail to sustain over the longer term. In addition, citizen science is under-recognised for its role in bridging between science and society, under-utilised where it is needed such as in relation to the Green Deal and the Sustainable Development Goals, and practitioners of citizen science are insufficiently recognised within the EU research and innovation system as conducting high-quality activities that can have numerous side-benefits.

In order to help remedy these weaknesses in the European research and innovation system, this action will launch two calls for proposals through financial support to third parties:

  • Kick-starting: This will kick-start and provide support services to at least 100 citizen science activities that are at the conceptual or pilot stage and which show promise in terms of innovative theme or approach, collecting and analysing data, or generating other important benefits.
  • Sustaining: This will support at least 25 on-going or recent citizen science activities to find ways to sustain their activities; these will have shown their worth in terms of innovative theme or approach, collecting and analysing data, generating other important benefits, or have particular potential to scale up across member states or the ERA.

Activities to be funded

The kick-starting and sustainable calls may be launched over one or more waves but it should not be necessary to be supported by the ‘kick-starting’ call to apply for ‘sustainable’ call. Efforts should be made to evaluate the response to the open calls, capture the benefits arising from the citizen science activities it kick-starts (social, economic, democratic, scientific, etc.), and develop intelligence about factors that support or hinder the sustainability of successful citizen science initiatives. In addition, this action should launch a European Union Prize for Citizen Science (funded by the action through financial support to third parties) open to all citizen science initiatives involving research and innovation actors, including civil society organisations, in the European Union.

The action should prepare, publicise and launch the competition, organise a high-profile award ceremony and showcase the breadth and scope of excellent citizen science activities taking place across the European Union. In close liaison with the Commission throughout the process, the action should decide on the award categories, setup the panel of experts that will evaluate the contestants, and develop the conditions for participation and the award criteria that enable identification of excellent/best-in-class examples of citizen science in terms of their contribution to the scientific evidence base and/or other benefits (e.g. societal, economic, democratic). The action should also set up a comprehensive communication strategy around the prize. Prizes should be awarded to several winners (e.g. for different categories) and be funded through financial support to third parties. Each prize should be in the range of EUR 10 000 – 60 000.

Across all three of parts (kick-starting, sustaining, and the citizen science prize), the action should consider citizen science across all areas of research and innovation and take into account all of the different forms of participation that citizen science can entail without prejudice to any. Significant efforts should be made to be inclusive in terms of geography, gender, ethnicity, disability, age, socio-economic background etc. The large majority of the funding should be allocated to the activities to kick-start and sustain citizen science initiatives. The action should develop policy recommendations, policy briefs, and other research and innovation results/outputs and disseminate its experiences and learnings widely.

The action should build on and valorise the results of earlier projects in the Science and Society (FP6), Science in Society (FP7) and Science with and for Society (Horizon 2020) programmes, in particular projects focused on public engagement, responsible research and innovation, and citizen science, as well as of national and regional initiatives, and should aim to provide a seamless transition between previous supporting actions and this new action.

Eligibility

To be eligible for funding, applicants must be established in one of the eligible countries, i.e.:

  • the Member States of the European Union, including their outermost regions;
  • the Overseas Countries and Territories (OCTs) linked to the Member States;
  • eligible non-EU countries:
    • countries associated to Horizon Europe
    • low and middle-income countries

At the date of the publication of the work programme, there are no countries associated to Horizon Europe. Considering the Union’s interest to retain, in principle, relations with the countries associated to Horizon 2020, most third countries associated to Horizon 2020 are expected to be associated to Horizon Europe with an intention to secure uninterrupted continuity between Horizon 2020 and Horizon Europe. In addition, other third countries can also become associated to Horizon Europe during the programme. For the purposes of the eligibility conditions, applicants established in Horizon 2020 Associated Countries or in other third countries negotiating association to Horizon Europe will be treated as entities established in an Associated Country, if the Horizon Europe association agreement with the third country concerned applies at the time of signature of the grant agreement

Legal entities which are established in countries not listed above will be eligible for funding if provided for in the specific call conditions, or if their participation is considered essential for implementing the action by the granting authority.

Consortium Composition

Unless otherwise provided for in the specific call conditions, legal entities forming a consortium are eligible to participate in actions provided that the consortium includes:

  • at least one independent legal entity established in a Member State;and
  • at least two other independent legal entities, each established in different Member States or Associated Countries.

Project Duration

The project should last a minimum of 4 years.

Budget

  • Expected EU contribution per project:

The Commission estimates that an EU contribution of around EUR 5.00 million would allow these outcomes to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of a proposal requesting different amounts.

  • Indicative budget:

The total indicative budget for the topic is EUR 5.00 million.

  • Funding rate:

100%

Application Details

See full details in the official call document.

All proposals must be submitted directly online via the Funding & Tenders Portal Electronic Submission System.




Horizon Europe: Pillar 3 - Policy coordination to advance the implementation of the ERA gender equality and inclusiveness objectives within Member States


Horizon Europe is the EU’s key funding programme for research and innovation.

The aim of this call is to contribute to the development of a consistent and sustainable coordination network of national representatives on gender equality and inclusiveness in support of the implementation of the European Research Area‘s Communication policy objectives.

Deadline: 23 September 2021, 17:00 Brussels time

Application Link Overview

The new European Research Area (Communication of 30 September 2020 on “A new ERA for Research and Innovation”) is foreseeing strong measures to promote inclusive gender equality plans in Research and Innovation (R&I) organisations, in line with the European Strategy for Gender Equality for the period 2020-2025, to which R&I, and Horizon Europe, must contribute actively. As the new ERA Communication and the Council Conclusions of 1 December 2020 on the new ERA underline, there is a need for policy coordination to advance the implementation of the ERA gender equality and inclusiveness objectives within the Member States. Ensuring the active promotion of equal opportunities for all includes opening up gender equality policies in R&I to diversity, and more specifically to: social categories and grounds for discrimination intersecting with gender, such as ethnicity, disability, sexual orientation or else socio-economic status; geographical inclusiveness; and opening to the innovation and private sector. This new inclusive approach to gender equality is also embedded in the new European Commission Gender Equality Strategy 2020-2025.

Building on related projects and actions supported through Horizon 2020, including project GENDERACTION, the action focuses on the establishment of a sustainable network of national representatives from all EU Member States and Associated Countries, both from national bodies (e.g. ministries) and from national research funding organisations, to support the implementation of the gender equality and inclusiveness objectives of the ERA.

Activities to be funded

The action should:

  • Develop various innovative and engagement activities, connect citizens, experts and policy makers, as well as contribute to policy making at national and European administration level.
  • Provide support and advancing the knowledge of representatives of widening countries is of particular importance. The action should also develop knowledge and build capacities, competences and expertise for gender equality and mainstreaming in R&I with a variety of European and national stakeholders. Special consideration will be given to mutual learning exercises to enhance the competence of national gender equality representatives, including helping less experienced national gender representatives to acquire expertise.
  • Establish a transnational Community of Practice of R&I funding organisations for the promotion of a gender-inclusive culture change in R&I institutions across Europe, linked through a Memorandum of Understanding. Specific attention should be paid to promoting the development of incentives or setting requirements at research funding level to foster institutional change in organisations, as well as establishing a zerotolerance policy on gender-based violence including sexual harassment in R&I organisations.
  • A specific focus should also be placed on promoting the integration of the gender dimension into R&I content, with an opening to intersectionality. For this, the action should foresee mobilising national expertise on the integration of the sex and gender analysis in R&I content to support the different Horizon Europe National Contact Points in all EU Member States.
  • The work by this action should be performed in coordination with ERA-related official groups, and in collaboration with the European Commission, in line with ERA objectives.

Eligibility

To be eligible for funding, applicants must be established in one of the eligible countries, i.e.:

  • the Member States of the European Union, including their outermost regions;
  • the Overseas Countries and Territories (OCTs) linked to the Member States;
  • eligible non-EU countries:
    • countries associated to Horizon Europe
    • low and middle-income countries

At the date of the publication of the work programme, there are no countries associated to Horizon Europe. Considering the Union’s interest to retain, in principle, relations with the countries associated to Horizon 2020, most third countries associated to Horizon 2020 are expected to be associated to Horizon Europe with an intention to secure uninterrupted continuity between Horizon 2020 and Horizon Europe. In addition, other third countries can also become associated to Horizon Europe during the programme. For the purposes of the eligibility conditions, applicants established in Horizon 2020 Associated Countries or in other third countries negotiating association to Horizon Europe will be treated as entities established in an Associated Country, if the Horizon Europe association agreement with the third country concerned applies at the time of signature of the grant agreement

Legal entities which are established in countries not listed above will be eligible for funding if provided for in the specific call conditions, or if their participation is considered essential for implementing the action by the granting authority.

Consortium Composition

The participation of at least 23 Member States, and in addition, of national representatives from Associated Countries, to the consortium, is strongly encouraged, and the project must engage and deploy activities with all EU Member States and, as much as possible, with all Associated Countries.

Budget

  • Expected EU contribution per project:

The Commission estimates that an EU contribution of around EUR 3.00 million would allow these outcomes to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of a proposal requesting different amounts.

  • Indicative budget:

The total indicative budget for the topic is EUR 3.00 million.

  • Funding rate:

100%

Application Details

See full details in the official call document.

All proposals must be submitted directly online via the Funding & Tenders Portal Electronic Submission System.